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Christmas Trees are coming! Be Prepared this December

Types of Christmas Trees

There are various types of Christmas trees available, and you must choose the one that is perfect for your home during the holiday season. There are various types, as you will see below:

Nordman Fir

The Norman Fir Christmas Tree barely drops its needles, making it the most popular choice in Modern times, due to the safety issues related to children and pets, and the sharp Christmas tree needles. They come in a range of shapes and sizes, and their needles are a lot fleshier.

Norway Spruce

The Norway Spruce Christmas tree, brings the classic smell of childhood to your home. Its needles do drop a lot more than other varieties, but it more than makes up for that with its beautiful smell, and really traditional tall and narrow shape.

Potted Christmas Trees

The Potted Christmas tree is a great choice if you would prefer your tree to last longer than just a few weeks, as potted trees are more likely to live on through the year, and be fine to use again a year later. The come in both varieties, the Nordman or Norway Spruce, and are often a little cheaper.

Where to buy a Christmas Tree

You can normally buy Christmas trees at your local garden centre, or check online for your nearest Christmas tree farm. Sapcote Garden Centre, Leicester, LE94LG, 01455 274049, (http://www.sapcotegc.co.uk/christmas/christmas-trees) has a range of Nordman Fir, and Norway Spruce Christmas trees for sale, and the price is the same as 2012.

Prince William and Kate Middleton’s love map of Britain

By

Claudia Joseph for the Daily Mail


Published:
17:07 EST, 17 April 2015

|
Updated:
05:06 EST, 18 April 2015

In just a few days’ time, Prince William and his wife Kate are due to have their second child, signalling the latest chapter in their lives together. A new book, called William And Kate’s Britain, traces the memorable moments of their story so far and the special places they hold dear. Here are some of the highlights.

1. College days

Prince William as he plays pool with friends at a bar in St Andrews where he went to university

Prince William as he plays pool with friends at a bar in St Andrews where he went to university

St Andrews, Scotland

They first met when at university, living in the same halls of residence, St Salvator’s Hall (Sallies) — both studying history of art (although William later changed to geography). In their second year, they shared a maisonette in the centre of the East coast town, renting it for £100 each a week with two friends.

They walked to lectures and shopped at Safeway. For their final two years, they lived in a £750,000 18th-century farmhouse on the sprawling Strathtyrum estate (owned by a distant cousin of Wills). The Prince installed a champagne fridge and Kate dressed the kitchen windows with red-and-white gingham curtains. They were allowed to shoot birds for food as part of their rental agreement.

2. Hunting her prince

Balmoral Estates, Aberdeenshire

It was at the royal estate — described by Queen Victoria as ‘my dear paradise in the Highlands’ — that new royal girlfriend Kate was first spotted dressed in camouflage gear, lying in the heather, being coached by ghillies on how to use a hunting rifle. This was ultimate proof that the girl from a middle-class family in Berkshire was being groomed to be a royal bride.

3. Lancashire love cake

Witton Country Park, Blackburn, Lancashire

Where Kate made her last public appearance as a single girl — in 2011. Alongside her boyfriend, she visited Witton Country Park (480 acres of picnic spots and nature trails which was used by the Army during both world wars and is now owned by Blackburn and Darwen Council). Lovebirds Wills and Kate were presented with the Lancashire traditional ‘Courting Cake’ — a heart-shaped shortbread cake with their names on the icing.

4. The island hideaway

The pair would exercised their cocker spaniel Lupo on Llanddwyn beach on the Isle of Anglesey

The pair would exercised their cocker spaniel Lupo on Llanddwyn beach on the Isle of Anglesey

Bodorgan Estates, Isle of Anglesey

With a private beach and views of Snowdonia, a four-bedroom whitewashed farmhouse on the south-west corner of the island is where they led a simple life in their first years of married life.

Renting from landowner Sir George Meyrick for £750 a week, they often went for drives in a battered white Ford Transit van, wearing baseball caps and sunglasses to try to be incognito. William was, though, spotted speeding along country lanes dressed in leathers and hiding behind his helmet on a red-and-white 180mph Ducati motorbike, with Kate occasionally riding pillion.

5. Romantic walks

Llanddwyn Beach, Isle of Anglesey

A favourite spot to exercise their cocker spaniel Lupo. The couple would walk hand in hand along the five-mile stretch of beach (Llanddwyn is named after St Dwynwen, who is the Welsh patron saint of lovers).

6. King-size bed

Healthbeds, Thurcroft Industrial Estate, Rotherham, South Yorkshire

Where they bought their marital bed — from a firm founded in 1893. The couple had slept in a similar four-poster with a bespoke mattress and made of ‘sumptuous cashmere, silk, cotton and wool fillings’ while living in rented accommodation in Anglesey.

Desperate to buy one of their own, they asked their former landlord in North Wales for details and tracked down the 4,200-spring model to the Yorkshire company, which says its beds allow people to ‘enjoy a healthier night’s sleep by combining state-of-the-art technology with traditional craftsmanship’.

7. Field of dreams

Aston Villa Football Club, Villa Park, Trinity Road, Birmingham

After the birth of George, William (who is the President of the Football Association) said he was determined that his son would inherit his love of the team. In a message recorded to mark the FA’s 150th anniversary, the Prince joked: ‘When Villa thrash Man U at Villa Park, my son will be there.’

8. A cake fit for a prince

The eight-tiered cake, made by a team of chefs in two months, was decorated with 900 sugar-paste flowers

The eight-tiered cake, made by a team of chefs in two months, was decorated with 900 sugar-paste flowers

Fiona Cairns Wedding Cakes, Fleckney, Leicestershire

Fiona Cairns started her pastry-making career by baking a batch of miniature fruit cakes in baked bean cans for friends one christmas. Twenty-five years later, her team now sells bespoke cakes from £500 (with 20 candles costing just £2.50) and she was invited to create the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge’s wedding cake.

The eight-tiered cake, made by a team of chefs in two months, was decorated with 900 sugar-paste flowers. It is believed that William and Kate saved the top three layers for themselves — suggesting we might yet have three royal christenings.

9. A right royal house party

The Sandringham Estate, Norfolk

Kate’s first visit to the Queen’s Norfolk country retreat was for a shooting party in 2002, hosted by Prince William at Wood Farm, a modest cottage, set in a secluded corner of the Sandringham Estate. She was one of six girls and ten boys — including the Prince — crammed into the six-bedroom cottage.

10. bolt-hole that got £1.5m makeover

Anmer Hall, Norfolk

The Queen’s wedding present to William and Kate — after a £1.5 million make-over of the late-Georgian property. This involved stripping out a £38,000 kitchen (featuring £17,000 worth of worktops and an £8,630 fridge). Built in 1802, it is one and a half miles from Sandringham House.

11. Room with a bath big enough for two

Camilla’s son, Tom Parker Bowles, married Harpers & Queen fashion journalist Sara Buys at the Grade II-listed church in front of a host of royals

Camilla’s son, Tom Parker Bowles, married Harpers & Queen fashion journalist Sara Buys at the Grade II-listed church in front of a host of royals

The Westleton Crown, Southwold, Suffolk

This 12th-century coaching inn was where they spent the night before their first wedding anniversary. They were among a group staying here for the wedding of two friends.

On arrival, they had a glass of champagne with the other guests, who included Kate’s sister Pippa, before retiring to the £165-a-night Swan Room, which had a four-poster bed and a ‘stylish roll-top bath big enough for two’.

12. Wizards and heroes

Warner Bros Studios, Hertfordshire

A six-months-pregnant Kate, with William and Prince Harry, visited the Warner Bros Studio in 2013 for a tour of the Harry Potter set. They were each given a wand, taught a few spell techniques, and invited to duel (Kate successfully took on her husband).

The trio, who were accompanied by 500 guests and children associated with their charities, were shown props from the Batman film The Dark Knight Rises, including the Batmobile and Bat Bike. ‘We should borrow that for the weekend!’ William whispered to Harry.

13. Society wedding shy kate had to miss

St Nicholas’ Anglican Church, Rotherfield Greys, Oxfordshire

Camilla’s son, Tom Parker Bowles, married Harpers & Queen fashion journalist Sara Buys at the Grade II-listed church in front of a host of royals — the Prince of Wales, William and Harry — but Kate (who was still only William’s girlfriend at the time in 2005) turned down the invite so as not to divert attention from the wedding couple’s day (pictured right).

14. Polo with George

The Duchess of Cambridge, Prince George and Prince William aer pictured here at  Cirencester Polo Club

The Duchess of Cambridge, Prince George and Prince William aer pictured here at  Cirencester Polo Club

Cirencester Park Polo Club, Gloucestershire

It was here that William spent his first Father’s Day as a parent, and his son George kicked his first ball in public. Kate took their 11-month-old to watch William and Uncle Harry playing for the Jerudong Trophy (above left) but the toddler did not want to sit still.

As soon as Kate put him down, he headed towards a pony and grabbed a polo stick in an attempt to join in the fun.

Then he aimed a kick at a ball with his left foot, suggesting that he might, like his father, grandfather and great-grandmother the Queen, be left-handed.

15. High times at Highgrove

Highgrove House, Tetbury, Gloucestershire

Kate received her first invitation to father-in-law Prince Charles’s country home in 2007 when she was invited to Camilla’s 60th birthday banquet. Other guests included comedians Joan Rivers and Stephen Fry, and actress Judi Dench. After dinner, Kate and William took to the dance floor, where the Prince mouthed the lyrics of the Frank Sinatra song It Had To Be You to his girlfriend.

16. Wedding bells

Westminster Abbey, London

The couple were pronounced man and wife at precisely 11.20am on April 29, 2011, by the Archbishop of Canterbury, Dr Rowan Williams. Twenty minutes earlier, the tension was palpable as Kate emerged from her car in an ivory silk and lace gown designed by Sarah Burton and inspired by the late actress Grace Kelly.

According to a lip-reader, William told his bride she looked ‘beautiful’ as she joined him at the altar, before joking to his father-in-law it was all ‘just a small family affair’.

17. It’s a boy!

Kate and William leaving St Mary's Hospital in London with new-born George

Kate and William leaving St Mary’s Hospital in London with new-born George

St Mary’s Hospital, Paddington, West London

Prince George became the tenth royal baby to be born at this hospital, which was founded in 1851 from small philanthropic beginnings based on ‘Christian and genteel values’, in an area teeming with sailors and prostitutes.

It opened with just 50 beds and was a voluntary hospital for the benefit of the sick poor of North and North-West London. Prince George was delivered at 4.24pm on July 22, 2013, weighing 8lb 6oz. His father William had been born at the same hospital.

18. Nuts about KP

Kensington Palace, the couple’s London home

This was controversially refurbished at taxpayers’ expense for an estimated £4 million. Extensive work included the construction of a new roof, the overhaul of electrics and the removal of asbestos. Their apartment — which has 22 rooms — was designed by Christopher Wren and was the home of Princess Margaret until her death in 2002.

19. Kate’s humble heritage

Holy Trinity Church, Southall

It was two months after the Queen’s Coronation in 1953 that Kate’s maternal grandparents, Ronald and Dorothy Goldsmith, got married here. Ronald was a lorry driver, working for his brother-in-law’s haulage company; Dorothy, who had two matrons of honour and two bridesmaids, was a shop assistant in Dorothy Perkins.

20. A sea of poppies

William, Kate and Harry visited the memorial in August last year to commemorate the 100th anniversary of World War I

William, Kate and Harry visited the memorial in August last year to commemorate the 100th anniversary of World War I

The Tower of London

William, Kate and Harry visited the memorial in August last year to commemorate the 100th anniversary of World War I, and they placed one of the 888,246 ceramic poppies, which each represented a fallen soldier.

21. The party prince

Mahiki night club, Mayfair

A favourite of the couple before they married. William drowned his sorrows here in 2007 after his split (which proved only temporary) from Kate. His group ran up a bar bill of £4,700. William is said to have yelled: ‘I’m free!’, before performing his own version of the robot-dance goal celebration that the then England footballer Peter Crouch had shown him during a World Cup training session.

‘Free?’ No. The couple were soon back together.

22. Wills’ Pop years

Eton College, Windsor, Berkshire

William’s time at school was marred by the death of his mother in 1997, when he was just 15. But he excelled at sport — he was ‘Keeper’ (in charge) of the swimming team, took up water polo and captained his house football team — was a school prefect and member of the Eton Society (colloquially known as ‘Pop’) and left with three solid A-levels (A in geography, B in history of art and C in biology).

The Prince often went for tea with his grandmother, the Queen, over the river at Windsor Castle. As an old boy, William went back to the school in 2006 to play in the Eton Field Game (a cross between rugby and football) after which Kate embraced him and playfully ruffled his prematurely thinning hair.

23. Kate’s school days

Kate was 14 when she went to the renowned public school

Kate was 14 when she went to the renowned public school

Marlborough College, Wiltshire

Kate was 14 when she went to the renowned public school (current annual boarding fees £33,090) in 1996. Nicknamed ‘Middlebum’, she was known for her ‘goofy’ behaviour and prowess at hockey (below). One schoolmate wrote in the leavers’ yearbook for 2000: ‘Catherine’s perfect looks are renowned, but her obsessions with her t**s are not. She is often found squinting down her top screaming: “They’re growing!” She was rumoured to have had a poster of Prince William on the wall above her bed.

24. The Middleton local

Old Boot Inn, Stanford Dingley, Berkshire

A regular haunt of the Middleton family (and Prince William), so much so that the landlord was invited to the royal wedding. The whole village celebrated with a barbecue at the pub in the evening. The current menu includes ‘Prawn Cocktail served with fresh buttered bread’ (£6.50) and, of course, ‘Eton Mess served in a filo pastry basket’ for £5.95.

25. A lobster for George

The National Lobster Hatchery, Padstow, Cornwall

‘One lucky little lobster here has been adopted by royalty,’ trumpeted the pioneering marine conservation, research and education charity after Prince Philip had bought a £2.50 Adopt a Lobster certificate for his great-grandson, Prince George, last year. The lad is sent regular updates on the creature’s progress.

■ William And Kate’s Britain: A Unique Guide To The Haunts Of The Duke And Duchess Of Cambridge by Claudia Joseph is published by Splendid Books on April 21 at £9.99. © 2015 Claudia Joseph. Order at mailbookshop.co.uk or call 0808 272 0808; p&p is free for a limited time only.

 

Xmas Holidays

SEBASTIAN SHAKESPEARE: Lady Falkender claims £128,000 for five years of taxis to Lords

By

Sebastian Shakespeare for the Daily Mail


Published:
20:05 EST, 17 April 2015

|
Updated:
04:43 EST, 18 April 2015

Baroness Falkender's continuing presence on the red benches  has led to a hefty bill for the taxpayer

Baroness Falkender’s continuing presence on the red benches has led to a hefty bill for the taxpayer

Harold Wilson’s former private secretary Baroness Falkender offers eloquent proof that silence is golden.

While the Labour peer has not made a single verbal or written contribution in more than 40 years in the House of Lords, her continuing presence on the red benches through declining health has led to a hefty bill for the taxpayer.

For the past 15 years, in addition to claiming a £300 daily attendance allowance, she has qualified to be ferried by taxi to and from the upper house due to an unspecified disability.

Between 2006 and 2011, the former Marcia Williams claimed £128,000 from a fund to help disabled members with extra travel costs, peaking at £3,700 in a single month. Details of her claims before 2006 have been destroyed ‘in accordance with procedures’ as data is kept for only a limited time, the Lords says.

If claimed at the same rate over the full time she has been allowed taxis on expenses, the bill would be around £250,000.

Records show the peer was still filing claims as recently as January 2014, when two invoices were ‘incorrectly completed and were not paid’. The House of Lords declines to give further details.

Travel payments to the peer, who had a countryside address in Northamptonshire until 2012, as well as an abode in a fashionable part of London, averaged £400 for each visit.

As Wilson’s private and political secretary throughout his tenures as Prime Minister in the Sixties and Seventies, Falkender was reputed to be the ‘most powerful woman in British politics’.

She allegedly wrote the so-called ‘Lavender List’ — Wilson’s 1976 Resignation Honours List written on purple notepaper — which she has always denied. The BBC had to pay her £75,000 in libel damages in 2007 after broadcasting a drama-documentary, which made out that she had an affair with Wilson and that it was she, rather than the prime minister, who compiled the infamous list whose recipients included wealthy businessman Lord Kagan, who was later convicted of fraud.

Long-serving: Falkender with Wilson in 1964

Long-serving: Falkender with Wilson in 1964

The House of Lords authorities initially blocked the release of Lady Falkender’s travel claims, citing the Data Protection Act, because it might ‘reveal details of her disability’.

But after an appeal, they confirmed the sum she was paid from 2006 and that Falkender, 83, is likely to have received tens of thousands of pounds more in preceding years.

The House of Lords says: ‘Approval for Baroness Falkender to claim additional support because of her disability was granted in July 2000. It relates to the use of a car service to attend the House.

‘The entitlement to claim expenses due to a disability is, where appropriate, subject to an assessment by a senior consultant occupational physician and reviewed periodically. All claims for expenses must be supported by appropriate receipts and documentation.’

When Baroness Falkender reached the 40-year mark last year, I revealed she had claimed the £300 attendance allowance 66 times between October 2010 and the end of March 2014 — totalling £19,800. Under House of Lords rules, members receive the allowance for carrying out ‘Parliamentary business’, but this can involve simply casting a vote and there is no requirement to contribute to debates.

During her time in the Lords, she has attended only one in nine votes — 220 out of more than 1,800.

Parliamentary officials insist her conduct is within the rules. A House of Lords spokesman says: ‘A recent report from the independent Commissioner for Standards confirmed that to be eligible to claim the daily attendance allowance, a member must both attend the House and undertake Parliamentary work.’

There is no precise definition of Parliamentary duties — and the Lords will investigate Falkender’s conduct only if a formal complaint is made.

Baroness Falkender was unavailable for comment.

Snap that saw Buble branded a sexist pig

The most offensive thing about Canadian crooner Michael Buble is usually his music, which some critics find unbearably cheesy.

But the 39-year-old, who is married to lingerie model Luisana Lopilato, has caused a social media storm by sharing this photo of himself in Miami with a girl in bottom-baring shorts in the background, captioning it: ‘There was something about this photo Lu took that seemed worthy of Instagram.’ He added search tags: ‘Baby got back’, ‘hungry shorts’ and ‘beautiful bum’.

Canadian crooner Michael Buble caused offence after posting this picture on Instagram

Canadian crooner Michael Buble caused offence after posting this picture on Instagram

Some fans immediately took offence. ‘Have some respect, you misogynistic p****,’ one commented online, while another said: ‘Not only is it creepy, the thing that makes it sexual assault are the tags over-sexualising her body.’

Though some defended Buble, who once dated actress Emily Blunt, others grumbled on, with one declaring: ‘If you didn’t ask her permission to post this, you’re being a creep and that’s the bottom line.’

Few architects have had a career to match Lord Foster.

But the designer of the Gherkin skyscraper in London has been less successful as a jeweller.

His former wife, Sabiha Rumani Malik, put up for auction the titanium wedding band that he created in her honour. The sale was expected to fetch between £3,000 and £5,000 for charity.

However, the ring failed to spark sufficient interest at Bonhams and went unsold.

Perhaps it would have helped if their marriage had endured beyond four years.

Relief at last for Alison Jackson, famous for her spoof snaps of celebrity lookalikes. 

She was having problems finding a Nigel Farage as no one wanted to admit they resembled him. 

‘Yes, I’ve found a Farage,’ she tells me. ‘His wife contacted me through Facebook. He was unsure and nervous about the fact he may look like the Ukip leader, and slightly outraged.’ 

Photographer Alison Jackson, famous for her spoof snaps of celebrity lookalikes, has finally found a Farage doppleganger 

Photographer Alison Jackson, famous for her spoof snaps of celebrity lookalikes, has finally found a Farage doppleganger 

Xmas Holidays

Cardinal urges forgiveness for Germanwings’ Andreas Lubitz

  • 1,500 people are attending the touching ceremony at Cologne cathedral
  • Among them are 500 relatives of those who died in Germanwings crash 
  • The doomed plane was ‘deliberately’ crashed by its ‘depressed’ co-pilot
  • Cardinal Woelki has urged compassion for all victims, including Lubitz

By

Jay Akbar For Mailonline


Published:
05:31 EST, 17 April 2015

|
Updated:
09:29 EST, 17 April 2015

The 150 people killed in the Germanwings air disaster in the French Alps have been remembered at a memorial service in Germany today.

The Cardinal who led the service at the historic Cologne cathedral urged forgiveness for all of the victims – including co-pilot Andreas Lubitz who is widely blamed for ‘deliberately’ crashing the jet after locking the captain out of the cockpit.

An investigation into the disaster revealed that Lubitz previously suffered from severe depression and his home computer showed he had researched ways of committing suicide.

German President Joachim Gauck said the tragedy had not only provoked grief and sorrow, adding: ‘We’re being confronted with a disturbing act of destruction. 

Speaking at the ceremony, he said: ‘We can’t find an answer to the question of why so many people had to die because of a decision that one person made.’

Small wooden angels were placed on the pews to comfort the 500 bereaved relatives of the doomed flights who were among 1,500 to attend the touching service. 

And flags have been flown at half-mast across the country as political and religious leaders join hundreds of bereaved relatives in the west-German city this morning.

Memorial: German Chancellor Angela Merkel (second from left) and President Joachim Gauck (second from right) among were among the 1,500 attending a ceremony to remember the victims of the tragic Germanwings air disaster at Cologne Cathedral (pictured) today

Memorial: German Chancellor Angela Merkel (second from left) and President Joachim Gauck (second from right) among were among the 1,500 attending a ceremony to remember the victims of the tragic Germanwings air disaster at Cologne Cathedral (pictured) today

Compassion: German Cardinal Rainer Woelki (left) - who is leading today's service - urged forgiveness for all the crash's victims, including the co-pilot blamed for bringing the plane down

Compassion: German Cardinal Rainer Woelki (left) – who is leading today’s service – urged forgiveness for all the crash’s victims, including the co-pilot blamed for bringing the plane down

Memorial: 150 candles have been lit in front of the altar of the cathedral where Cardinal Rainer Woelki will lead the service

Memorial: 150 candles have been lit in front of the altar of the cathedral where Cardinal Rainer Woelki will lead the service

Grateful: North Rhine-Westphalia's State Premier Hannelore Kraft (left) shakes hands with a member of emergency services on behalf of the church

Grateful: North Rhine-Westphalia’s State Premier Hannelore Kraft (left) shakes hands with a member of emergency services on behalf of the church

Humbled: Kraft paid her respects to those killed in the air disaster by bowing in front of the candles lit in their memory 

Humbled: Kraft paid her respects to those killed in the air disaster by bowing in front of the candles lit in their memory 

Upset: Meanwhile hundreds of emotional locals (pictured) gathered to watch and listen to the memorial service outside the cathedral

Upset: Meanwhile hundreds of emotional locals (pictured) gathered to watch and listen to the memorial service outside the cathedral

Leaders: German Chancellor (centre) attended the memorial - as did President Joachim Gauck (top left) who said the tragedy had provoked grief and sorrow

Leaders: German Chancellor (centre) attended the memorial – as did President Joachim Gauck (top left) who said the tragedy had provoked grief and sorrow

Ceremony: Lufthansa Chief Executive Carsten Spohr (left) and Germanwings Managing Director Thomas Winkelmann (right) attended the memorial service for the 150 victims of Germanwings flight 4U 9525

Ceremony: Lufthansa Chief Executive Carsten Spohr (left) and Germanwings Managing Director Thomas Winkelmann (right) attended the memorial service for the 150 victims of Germanwings flight 4U 9525

Greetings: North-Rhine Westphalia's Prime Minister Hannelore Kraft (centre) welcomed Lufthansa boss Spohr ahead of the ceremony which will be broadcast nationwide

Greetings: North-Rhine Westphalia’s Prime Minister Hannelore Kraft (centre) welcomed Lufthansa boss Spohr ahead of the ceremony which will be broadcast nationwide

Tragedy: Le Vernet mayor Francois Balique (left), Seyne les Alpes Mayor Francis Hermitte (right) and Prads-Haute-Bleone Mayor Bernard Bartolini (right) - who preside over the area where the plane crashed - were also in attendance

Tragedy: Le Vernet mayor Francois Balique (left), Seyne les Alpes Mayor Francis Hermitte (right) and Prads-Haute-Bleone Mayor Bernard Bartolini (right) – who preside over the area where the plane crashed – were also in attendance

Touching: The moving ceremony will also be broadcast on screens outside and to German homes across the country, with one resident saying they are all 'touched by this horrific catastrophe'

Touching: The moving ceremony will also be broadcast on screens outside and to German homes across the country, with one resident saying they are all ‘touched by this horrific catastrophe’

Heart-breaking: Political and religious leaders (pictured) joined hundreds of bereaved relatives in the west-German city this morning to remember those who died in the plane crash

Heart-breaking: Political and religious leaders (pictured) joined hundreds of bereaved relatives in the west-German city this morning to remember those who died in the plane crash

Blamed: French prosecutors revealed the plane's co-pilot Andreas Lubitz (pictured) 'deliberately' brought down the plane after locking its captain out of the cockpit

Blamed: French prosecutors revealed the plane’s co-pilot Andreas Lubitz (pictured) ‘deliberately’ brought down the plane after locking its captain out of the cockpit

Victims: The jet which was heading to Dusseldorf in Germany from Barcelona was carrying 150 passengers - including young school children - who all died when it crashed (pictured)

Victims: The jet which was heading to Dusseldorf in Germany from Barcelona was carrying 150 passengers – including young school children – who all died when it crashed (pictured)

A white flag with a black cross blew in the wind on the square outside where hundreds more people amassed to watch the ceremony on large screens, while buses and trains in the city stood still for one minute before the service started.

Inside the cathedral, 150 candles were lit in front of the altar where speeches were given – one for every person killed in the disaster.

The country’s Chancellor Angela Merkel and President Joachim Gauck attended the service – as did Spain’s Interior Minister Jorge Fernandez and French Transport Minister Alain Vidalies.

Lufthansa chairman Carsten Spohr was also among the 1,500 guests, including 500 of the victims’ families.

The event at Europe’s largest Gothic church in the west-German city was broadcast live on screens outside the cathedral and to millions of viewers nationwide.

Cologne resident Ursula Mund said she would be among those watching on the large square in the city centre.

The 53-year-old said: ‘Of course this is a special occasion. We have all talked a lot about what happened and are still baffled by it. We are still saddened and I feel very moved today.’

Michael Senker who will follow the ceremony on television said: ‘It’s important to me to watch because all of Germany has been particularly affected by this tragedy. We all feel touched by this horrible catastrophe.’ 

Remembrance: Among the attendees are 500 bereaved family members whose relatives died in the horrific crash in the French Alps

Remembrance: Among the attendees are 500 bereaved family members whose relatives died in the horrific crash in the French Alps

Bereaved: Touching tributes and flowers (pictures) were left outside Cologne Cathedral this morning as the entire country mourns the victims of the air disaster

Bereaved: Touching tributes and flowers (pictures) were left outside Cologne Cathedral this morning as the entire country mourns the victims of the air disaster

Moving: Mourners left flowers and touching messages to the both the victims of the air disaster and the families they left behind

Devastated: The memorial at Cologe Cathedral today (pictured) follow a memorial event near the disaster site at the village of Le Vernet in the French Alps

Devastated: The memorial at Cologe Cathedral today (pictured) follow a memorial event near the disaster site at the village of Le Vernet in the French Alps

Never forget: Posters of black ribbons (pictured)bearing the flight number of the doomed Germanwings jet have been displayed near the cathedral where the memorial is taking place today

Never forget: Posters of black ribbons (pictured)bearing the flight number of the doomed Germanwings jet have been displayed near the cathedral where the memorial is taking place today

Mourning: Flags have been flown at half-mast across the country, including on Germany's parliament building in Berlin (pictured)

Mourning: Flags have been flown at half-mast across the country, including on Germany’s parliament building in Berlin (pictured)

Union: The memorial service will be led by the Archbishop of Cologne, Cardinal Rainer Maria Woelki, and the president of the Protestant Church of Westphalia 

Union: The memorial service will be led by the Archbishop of Cologne, Cardinal Rainer Maria Woelki, and the president of the Protestant Church of Westphalia 

Forgiveness: Cologne's Cardinal Rainer Woelki - who will lead the ceremony at the cathedral (pictured) - urged compassion for all those who died in the crash including Lubitz

Forgiveness: Cologne’s Cardinal Rainer Woelki – who will lead the ceremony at the cathedral (pictured) – urged compassion for all those who died in the crash including Lubitz

Mourners lay flowers and lit candles on the stairways leading to the cathedral – and outside the city’s main railway station nearby.

A bouquet of white tulips left at the foot of the cathedral had a card with the message ‘depression is incalculable,’ referring to co-pilot Andreas Lubitz who suffered from the illness.

Cologne’s Cardinal Rainer Woelki – who will lead the ceremony – urged compassion for all those who died in the crash including Lubitz, saying: ‘There are 150 victims.’

The Germanwings Airbus 320 was en route to Duesseldorf from Barcelona when it crashed in the French Alps on March 24 – killing everyone aboard.

Germany was devastated by the loss of its citizens which included 16 young students and two teachers from a high school in the small town of Haltern-am-See who were returning from a class trip to Spain.

Co-pilot Lubitz, who had been diagnosed as suicidal in the past, is believed to have deliberately flown the plane into the mountainside after locking the captain out of the cockpit. 

Disastrous: Among those who died when the plane went down in the French Alps (pictured) were 16 young students and two teachers from a high school in the small town of Haltern-am-See

Disastrous: Among those who died when the plane went down in the French Alps (pictured) were 16 young students and two teachers from a high school in the small town of Haltern-am-See

Remains: Co-pilot Lubitz who is widely blamed for the crash had previously been diagnosed as suicidal

Remains: Co-pilot Lubitz who is widely blamed for the crash had previously been diagnosed as suicidal

Investigators suspect Lubitz locked the captain out of the cockpit before putting the plane into descent and increasing the jet’s speed several times as it went down.

Aviation industry doctors have since demanded that German pilots undergo more extensive medical checks, while several airlines worldwide have changed rules to require two crew in cockpits at all times.

Lufthansa – the parent company of Germanwings – cancelled its 60th anniversary celebrations set for April.

It also placed memorial pages in major newspapers dedicated to the memory of passengers and staff who died in the disaster saying: ‘We will never forget them.’

Loved ones of victims previously attended a memorial event near the disaster site at the village of Le Vernet in the French Alps.

On April 13, foreign ministers of Germany, Spain and France also paid tribute to the victims at Barcelona airport, where the passengers embarked.

Xmas Holidays

The spoils of Empire: Bounty looted by Wellington’s men from defeated Tiger of Mysore’s Indian palace set to sell for £1million

  • 30-year-old Duke of Wellington fought Tipu Sultan as an army general in 1799
  • Tipu was killed in the defeat and soldiers plundered the city and palace for jewels and riches
  • Modern British collector was ‘obsessed with’ Sultan, acquiring works over 30 years
  • Sale of his collection could fetch £1million with personal gun tipped to get £150,000 alone 

By

James Dunn For Mailonline

and
Bournemouth News And Picture Service


Published:
07:39 EST, 17 April 2015

|
Updated:
09:29 EST, 17 April 2015

They are the remnant of a bygone era, when Sultan’s ruled one of the world’s oldest empires, living in a forgotten age of opulence and extravagance in India’s immense palace estates.

But when the Duke of Wellington ‘s forces defeated and killed Tipu Sultan, the Tiger of Mysore, in 1799, troops plundered the city and the palace, returning to Britain with gold, jewellery, arms, armour, clothing and even Tipu’s grand throne. 

This month, a collection of the historic artefacts from this exotic empire will go on sale at London auction house Bonhams, and experts expect them to fetch a total of around £1million.

Pure opulence: A gem-set sword with pink, green and red stones and an ornate tiger’s head pommel is expected to sell for £80,000.

This rare quilted helmet with a gold koftgari bar, incredibly artistic stitching and the wonderfully bright colours of India is set to sell for £35,000

This rare quilted helmet with a gold koftgari bar, incredibly artistic stitching and the wonderfully bright colours of India is set to sell for £35,000

The Tiger of Mysore: Wellington's first worthy adversary on his way to Waterloo died on the battlefield before troops plundered the city and palace, returning to Britain with the spoils of war. A collection of these items will go on sale at London auction house Bonhams this month

Great adversaries: The Tiger of Mysore, Tipu Sultan, left, and army general, Arthur Wellesley, right, fought in India in 1799. War was waged after spies intercepted a letter from the Sultan proposing an alliance with the French. Wellesley went on to become the Duke of Wellington, defeating Napolean in the Battle of Waterloo. But he earned his stripes fighting in Mysore and rushed to check the sultan’s pulse when he was killed

These items are not just arms and armour but far more than that – they’re works of art
Claire Penhallurick, head of Islamic and Indian art at Bonhams

The item tipped to attract the biggest price is the Sultan’s personal sporting gun, a four-foot-long rifle made by his own armoury, tipped to make £150,000 alone.

It was given as a present to Lord Cornwallis, the Governor General of India, after the fall of Tipu and passed on to the Earls of Pembroke, staying in the family for 200 years.

A gold-coloured gem-set sword with an artistic tiger’s head pommel showing the craftsmanship of 18th-century Mysore is expected to sell for £80,000.

An archer’s set, made for Tipu, includes a beautiful gold and red embroidered quiver and arm guards, a belt with a finely-forged buckle and seven decorated arrows. It’s expected to sell for £60,000. 

The collection also includes a rare quilted helmet with a gold koftgari bar, stitched with a finely detailed pattern and the wonderfully bright colours associated with India, which is set to sell for £35,000.

One of the prize pieces is an artistically carved hardwood tiger-paw from the foot of Tipu’s throne – the only surviving piece of the once magnificent structure – which could make £20,000.

Bidders can buy a piece of history with a Mughal gem-set jade plaque, complete with a note stating it was found with the body of Tipu Sultan in 1799 after he died on the battlefield.

Other items up for sale include pistols, helmets, swords, intricately embroidered clothing and even a bronze field cannon used to defend the fortress at Seringapatam.

Atop of an empire: This historic picture shows what Tipu's magnificent throne would have looked like before he was toppled. On sale in the auction is the only surviving piece of the magnificent throne, a decoratively carved tiger foot with a silver plaque celebrating the victory

Atop of an empire: This historic picture shows what Tipu’s magnificent throne would have looked like before he was toppled. On sale in the auction is the only surviving piece of the magnificent throne, a decoratively carved tiger foot with a silver plaque celebrating the victory

Foot of the throne: A carved wood tiger paw from the foot of the throne of Tipu Sultan, expected to sell for £20,000

Foot of the throne: A carved wood tiger paw from the foot of the throne of Tipu Sultan, expected to sell for £20,000

Medal of honour: The silver plaque atop the foot of the throne commemorates the victory over one of the greatest sultans in history

Medal of honour: The silver plaque atop the foot of the throne commemorates the victory over one of the greatest sultans in history

A golden age: This embroidered quiver and arm guards, belt and seven decorated arrows, made for Tipu, is expected to sell for £60,000

A golden age: This embroidered quiver and arm guards, belt and seven decorated arrows, made for Tipu, is expected to sell for £60,000

The items were collected over 30 years by British Tipu expert Robin Wigington, who even turned part of his house in Stratford Upon Avon into a museum and allowed some of them to be displayed in exhibitions worldwide.

He sold his collection to a private collector in 2005 and they have now been put up for sale again.

Claire Penhallurick, head of Islamic and Indian art at Bonhams, said: ‘It is very unusual for there to be an auction of so many artefacts that once belonged to Tipu. It is the product of one man who collected for nearly 30 years.

‘Robin Wigington was an arms and armour gentleman dealer who collected these pieces over three decades. He was obsessed with Tipu – he published pieces and loaned items to major exhibitions.

‘In the end he built his own museum at his home in Stratford Upon Avon which was open for six years, during which time it won an award for the best British museum.

‘One of the highlights of this sale is one of the feet that Tipu’s throne rested on.

‘Quite a few of the items are signed and dated by the manufacturer, making them incredibly important historical documents because it allows other items from the same era to be dated.

‘Many of the pieces have previous metal inlays and incredibly decorative touches. It’s very obvious they’re Tipu’s pieces.

‘Wigington had an eye for quality and he collected the best of the best. These items are not just arms and armour but far more than that – they’re works of art.

HOW WELLINGTON EARNED HIS STRIPES IN INDIA FIGHTING WORTHY OPPONENT THE TIGER OF MYSORE

Storming of Seringapatam under General Baird and death of Tipu Sultan, May 4, 1799, in the Mysore War. Tipu Sultan was shot and killed in the onslaught

Storming of Seringapatam under General Baird and death of Tipu Sultan, May 4, 1799, in the Mysore War. Tipu Sultan was shot and killed in the onslaught

Wellington was a 30-year-old army general when he led troops to Mysore in the late 18th century.

Then a young Arthur Wellesley, he earned his stripes and learned skills fighting Tipu, nicknamed the Tiger of Mysore, that would later prove vital in defeating French dictator Napoleon on the battlefields of Waterloo.

His elder brother Richard Wellesley, the British Governor General, had waged war against the sultan after a spy intercepted a letter from Napoleon proposing an alliance.

It was to be the fourth war between the Brits and the southern Indian kingdom of Mysore in just over 30 years.

Wellesley led the British army into Tipu’s stronghold of Seringapatam, the capital of Mysore, on April 5 1799 with the military planning and precision that came to be his strongest attributes.

More than two decades letter Wellesley, by then the Duke of Wellington, used the same skills he had learned against Tipu Sultan to crush Napoleon at the Battle of Waterloo.

After several weeks of besieging the city the Brits were able to breach the walls of its fortress.

Tipu Sultan was shot and killed in the onslaught, and Wellesley dashed to the scene to check his pulse.

Weelington went on to become one of the most famed leaders in military history. 

‘Tipu Sultan was one of the greatest rulers in Indian history, but interest in him comes from all over the world.’ 

‘He was the first adversary of General Arthur Wellesley, who went on to become the Duke of Wellington.

‘It would be fair to say Wellesley learned the skills he later displayed at the Battle of Waterloo fighting against Tipu, although Tipu gave the Brits a good run for their money.

‘After the fall of Tipu the British took over his palace and some of his items were divided up among officers.

‘A series of auctions were held over three days in Seringapatam where more treasures were sold.

‘Some of these items we are selling could have come from these auctions, or they could have been gifted to officers at the time.

‘Many of the pieces have 200-year provenances in the UK.

‘Some were personal weapons of Tipu’s – one such is a huge gun with a crouching tiger carved into the butt which was gifted to Lord Cornwallis after the fall of Seringapatam. 

Mughal gem-set jade plaque with note stating it was found with the body of Tipu Sultan in 1799, estimated to sell for £20,000
A metal-thread embroidered quilted velvet quirass, expected to sell for £20,000

Mughal gem-set jade plaque with note stating it was found with the body of Tipu Sultan, left, and A metal-thread embroidered quilted velvet quirass, expected to sell for £20,000, right. The items will be on sale at the Bonhams auction on April 21

EXHIBITIONS SHOW MAN BEHIND THE TITLE TO COMMEMORATE 200TH ANNIVERSARY OF HISTORIC BATTLE

The Duke of Wellington's former home Apsley House on Hyde Park Corner where he hosted grand events to commemorate the historic battle

The Duke of Wellington’s former home Apsley House on Hyde Park Corner where he hosted grand events to commemorate the historic battle

The Duke of Wellington’s handwritten orders from the Battle of Waterloo and a pair of the original ‘Wellington boots’ are among items in two exhibitions to mark the 200th anniversary of the conflict.

English Heritage is putting on new displays at Wellington Arch at Hyde Park Corner and nearby Apsley House, the London home of the first Duke of Wellington, who commanded the army that defeated Napolean in modern day Belgium in 1815.

They mark the bicentenary of the battle in which British and Prussian forces finally defeated Bonaparte, bringing an end to conflict which had raged in Europe and the wider world for 20 years.

At Wellington’s former home, Apsley House, which dates back to the 1770s, visitors will be able see the Waterloo Gallery as it was when he hosted annual banquets to commemorate the battle.

Josephine Oxley, keeper of the Wellington collection, said visitors would be able to find out about the man behind the battle and also see the scale of the banquets which took place every year from 1820 until the duke died in 1852.

‘Once the Waterloo Gallery was finished in 1828, the banquets expanded and became very glamorous affairs, so much so there were crowds outside, it was the red carpet event of its day.’

 

Xmas Holidays

It’s a Stitch Up

Hello and welcome to another challenge at Winter
Wonderland – Deborah here with the Icicles team.


Thank you for all your lovely entries into last
week’s challenge.  Last week’s winner as
chosen by Random Org is:


No. 8 – Dewi

Congratulations
– please email Deborah (Deb0210@hotmail.co.uk)
to claim your prize of  three digis from Crafty Sentiments before the end of
the current challenge. 


Please make the
subject of your email Winter Wonderland Winner and sponsor’s name.


Now
onto the top three in no particular order:


No. 7 – Chrissy



No. 9. Marie Bingaman



No. 10 – Liselot




Please take our top three banner to display proudly
on your blog.


Now onto this week’s challenge of:


It’s a Stitch Up (Real or Faux Stitching) 

This week we are sponsored by The Paper Shelter who are offering the winner a $15 gift certificate.



Here’s the inspiration from the DT.  We always appreciate a visit so if you click
the name you can hop over and leave them a comment and also find out if they
have combined their challenge with any others, which could give you some ideas.


Jennifer using Holy Night by The Paper Shelter




Pauline using Most Adorable Snowmen by the Paper Shelter




Marie using Santa Selfie by the Paper Shelter



Deborah using Most Adorable Snowmen by the Paper Shelter



We all hope you are able to join us in our
challenge this week.  We look forward to
visiting your blogs and seeing your gorgeous creations.  Please be sure to post a link back to the
Winter Wonderland blog in your blog post in order to be eligible for this week’s
prize.  Thursday evening (5pm GMT) is the
deadline for your creation to qualify for the prize.

So all that’s left is for you to get creative and
leave your entry here with the blue frog so we can come and find you as soon as
possible.


Have fun and remember you can enter each challenge
up to three times.


Deborah and the WW
Teamies xxx




Christmas 2013

Morrisons to axe 720 head office jobs and recruit 5,000 shop floor staff

  • Staff made redundant to be offered jobs in stores
  • Push for 5,000 shop floor staff to open more checkouts 

By

Camilla Canocchi for Thisismoney.co.uk


Published:
09:02 EST, 16 April 2015

|
Updated:
09:24 EST, 16 April 2015

Morrisons is to cut up to 720 head office jobs while recruiting 5,000 shop floor staff as part of its plan to focus more on customer service.

Staff whose role was made redundant will be offered a job in one of its stores or the opportunity to take a voluntary redundancy, while some will be redeployed in other parts of the business, the supermarket chain said.

Meanwhile, Morrisons has begun recruiting 5,000 shop floor staff ‘to further improve service, increase availability, and open more checkouts’.

Supermarket job: Morrisons said it had begun recruiting 5,000 shop floor staff and that those losing their head office jobs would be offered a position in a Morrisons store

Supermarket job: Morrisons said it had begun recruiting 5,000 shop floor staff and that those losing their head office jobs would be offered a position in a Morrisons store

The news follows a recent announcement by new chief executive David Potts who said he would be constructing a ‘leaner management board’ as he ditched five members of its management team.

Potts, who took charge of the supermarket just a month ago after former chief executive Dalton Phillips was ousted, said he was focusing on the things that matter to Morrisons’ customers.

‘That means having more of our staff in our stores, improving product availability and helping customers at our checkouts. We believe our customers and our staff will appreciate the improvements,’ Potts said.

‘To support this, we need a simpler, faster and cost-conscious Head Office and that requires some tough but necessary decisions’, he added.

Morrisons said staff at its head office, where it currently employs 2,300 people, had increased by 50 per cent since 2008.

It also said it employs more than 20,000 people in Yorkshire in its manufacturing, logistics depots and supermarkets and that vacancies at these become vacant regularly.

Overhaul: New boss David Potts said they were focusing on the things that matter to Morrisons' customers

Overhaul: New boss David Potts said they were focusing on the things that matter to Morrisons’ customers

Potts, who has more than 40 years retailing experience at Tesco, recently launched a campaign to receive customer and staff feedback, announced he would work in a store in April and encouraged other head office staff to do the same. He also purchased over £1million of Morrisons’ shares.

He said last month: ‘I strongly believe that we are all retailers and we can learn how to serve our customers better when we are working in our stores or when we do our own shopping.’

The group posted a £792million annual loss last month, up from a deficit of £176million a year earlier, after writing down the value of its property portfolio by £1.3billion and a 5.9 per cent fall in sales.

As a result, Morrisons announced plans to close 23 of its underperforming M Local stores in the year ahead with the loss of more than 300 jobs and warned it would cut its future dividend.

Despite the slump in earnings, Morrisons said it would pay a total dividend of 13.65p for the full year, up 5 per cent. But it signalled lower future payouts, guiding to a dividend of not less than 5p a share for 2015-16.

Britain’s fourth biggest retailer saw sales fall 0.7 per cent, taking its market share down to a 10.9 per cent, according to last week’s Kantar Worldpanel data. 

Morrisons has been struggling to kickstart growth in the wake of fierce competition from discounters Aldi and Lidl, that has sparked a price war among the Big Four supermarkets Tesco, Sainsbury’s, Asda and Morrisons.

The supermarket has pledged £1billion to cut prices but it has been late in entering the fast-growing convenience and online grocery markets, only inking a deal with Ocado last year. 

Morrisons’ shares on the FTSE 100 were down 1.2 per cent, or 2.45p, at 201.15p in afternoon trading.

 

Xmas Holidays

South Africa woman becomes latest victim of rioting sparked by anti-immigrant protests

  • Anti-immigrant protests been taking place in South Africa for two weeks
  • Carol Lloyd injured after rocks thrown through car window in Jeppestown
  • Foreign nationals have been loading trucks with their wares as they flee Johannesburg and neighbouring towns over fears they will be targeted 
  • Anti-immigrant protesters angry about the number of foreigners living in South Africa at a time when unemployment is high and wealth is unequal 

By

Claire Carter for MailOnline


Published:
09:16 EST, 16 April 2015

|
Updated:
09:23 EST, 16 April 2015

A woman was left covered in blood after she was injured in the latest violent anti-immigrant protests in South Africa.

So far six people are believed to have been killed in the violent protests which started two weeks ago in Durban, a key port on South Africa’s Indian Ocean coast, spreading to Johannesburg.

In the latest show of violence around 200 protesters, shouting that they wanted immigrants to leave the country, pelted passing vehicles and the police with rocks. 

Carol Lloyd was left injured and covered in blood after rocks were thrown through and shattered her car window in the latest wave of anti-immigrant protests taking place near Johannesburg in South Africa 

Carol Lloyd was left injured and covered in blood after rocks were thrown through and shattered her car window in the latest wave of anti-immigrant protests taking place near Johannesburg in South Africa 

Carol Lloyd was forced to stop her car as she drove close to Jeppestown after she was injured after a rock smashed into her car window and shattered the glass. 

South African police responded to the wave of protests, which are motivated by the large number of immigrants and high unemployment rates, by firing rubber bullets and tear gas today to disperse the protesters.

Protests began two weeks ago and six people have been killed. Dozens of foreign nationals have emptied their shops and fled over fears of attacks.

President Jacob Zuma has called for the killings to stop.

Ms Lloyd was forced to stop her car after a rock was thrown through the window

Ms Lloyd stopped her car near Jeppestown, close to Johannesburg, where the violence spread to today 

‘I think this now must stop, because we cannot continue killing one another. What is happening in our country is not acceptable,’ Zuma told state broadcaster SABC. 

The ruling African National Congress party has condemned the attacks as ‘shameful’ and branded them ‘criminal acts against vulnerable people.’

In the past two weeks, shops and homes owned by Somalis, Ethiopians, Malawians and other immigrants in Durban and surrounding townships have been targeted, forcing families to flee to camps protected by armed guards. 

Foreign nationals living near Johannesburg were today seen removing items from their shops and shutting up their stores entirely because of fears they could be targeted by protesters.

Foreign nationals have been seen loading trucks with their goods as they flee Primrose, near Johannesburg

Foreign nationals have been seen loading trucks with their goods as they flee Primrose, near Johannesburg

Shop owners have been seen emptying their stores while armed police officers stand guard to protect them

Shop owners have been seen emptying their stores while armed police officers stand guard to protect them

Foreign nationals loaded up trucks to make their way out of the Johannesburg district, fearing more attacks

Foreign nationals loaded up trucks to make their way out of the Johannesburg district, fearing more attacks

They fled after a mobile phone text message was apparently sent to shop owners, warning them to shut their premises, claiming that ‘Zulu people are coming to town … to kill every foreigner on the road’.

In Primrose, near Germiston and about 15km out of Johannesburg, dozens of shops have been left empty and owners have been seen transporting their wares on trucks today. 

Durban’s impoverished townships have been at the heart of the recent clashes between locals and immigrants, following a similar spate of attacks on foreign-owned shops in Soweto, near Johannesburg, earlier this year.

A woman is seen reflected in the mirror of a shop, showing how the shelves have been left bare by owners 

A woman is seen reflected in the mirror of a shop, showing how the shelves have been left bare by owners 

A man carries bottles of soda that had been on sale in a store as foreign nationals decided to flee

A man carries bottles of soda that had been on sale in a store as foreign nationals decided to flee

Two men are pictured carrying a refrigerator as the two weeks of violent protest put them under threat

Two men are pictured carrying a refrigerator as the two weeks of violent protest put them under threat

Shelves and stores have been emptied as foreign nationals are likely to be targeted in the wave of protests 

Shelves and stores have been emptied as foreign nationals are likely to be targeted in the wave of protests 

More than 1,000 foreigners in Durban have fled their homes and are now living in makeshift camps under police guard.

South Africa has erected safe camps in the coastal city of Durban for fleeing immigrants whose shops were looted and burnt.

The country has a population of about 50 million, is home to an estimated five million immigrants, and its high jobless rate, widespread poverty and glaring income disparities make it a ripe candidate for outbreaks of anti-immigrant violence.

Unemployment is officially around 25 percent but economists say in reality it is much higher.

Johannesburg was the epicentre of the 2008 xenophobic attacks that killed more than 60 people. 

 

Xmas Holidays

Royal baby sales set to be a £70m flop warn retail experts

  • Retail experts say sales of royal memorabilia are unlikely to top £70m
  • By comparison, Prince George’s birth resulted in a £247m splurge
  • Between July and August 2013, £70m was lavished on souvenirs alone
  • The newest royal is expected to have a big long term impact however
  • Sales boost will be particularly noticeable if the new baby is a girl 

By

Ruth Styles for MailOnline


Published:
06:17 EST, 15 April 2015

|
Updated:
08:44 EST, 15 April 2015

Prince George’s birth in 2013 sparked a £247m sales bonanza for makers of royal memorabilia but experts say the second royal baby is unlikely to have the same effect.

A more modest sales increase of between £60 and £70m is predicted, with most of that spent on champagne and cake rather than royal souvenirs.

However, the baby is expected to make more of an impact in the long term – especially if the child turns out to be a girl. 

Scroll down for video 

Smaller scale: The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge's second child will have a lesser effect at the tills

Smaller scale: The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge’s second child will have a lesser effect at the tills

‘It’s not so much of a major event when you have another baby,’ explains Professor Joshua Bamfield, director of the Centre for Retail Research.

‘I think it will have an impact on the sales of prosecco and champagne and cake but not much more than that.’

Despite his warning, scores of companies are hoping to cash in on the second royal birth, with plans for items ranging from mugs to beauty boxes afoot. 

Leading the charge to the tills is the Royal Mint which announced plans for a commemorative £5 coin last week, and the Royal Collection Trust.

Potter Emma Bridgewater has designed a special mug, while beauty subscription company BirchBox is offering a ‘royally good’ box containing Korres showergel and Lola Barcelona nailpolish among other items.

Bonanza: The birth of Prince George sparked a £247m sales boom between the 1st July and 31st August 13

Bonanza: The birth of Prince George sparked a £247m sales boom between the 1st July and 31st August 13

Prince of Sales: Since then, George has gone on to replicate his mother's impact on clothing sales

Prince of Sales: Since then, George has gone on to replicate his mother’s impact on clothing sales

 

The new baby’s grandfather Prince Charles is also hoping for a baby-related boost to his charity coffers via products sold in his Highgrove shop.

Although no official memorabilia is planned, The Highgrove Shop, which turns over its profits to the Prince of Wales’s Charitable Foundation, already sells organic baby balm for £24.95, a Highgrove baby bear for £34.95 and a “happy and glorious” baby blanket, featuring guards in red tunics and bearskin hats, priced at £94.95.

The flurry of royal baby memorabilia echoes that sparked by the birth of Prince George, when the market was flooded by everything from bibs to books.

Other items included royal-themed potties, dummies featuring crowns, bibs proclaiming ‘I love Aunty Pippa’ and a book entitled Shhh! Don’t Wake The Royal Baby!

While there’s no shortage of choice this time around, Professor Bamfield says the baby’s long-term impact on retail will be more significant than the initial flurry.

‘When the baby has a certain sweater on, everybody will want to buy that,’ he says, pointing to the ongoing Kate and George effects.

Making his mark: Outfits worn by Prince George such as these Rachel Riley dungarees, sell out

Making his mark: Outfits worn by Prince George such as these Rachel Riley dungarees, sell out

New baby, new coin: The Royal Mint is producing a series of coins to mark the new royal birth

New baby, new coin: The Royal Mint is producing a series of coins to mark the new royal birth

‘The impact of the baby is going to be over a longer period, particularly if it’s a girl. [It will be about] the equipment they use, her clothes, her toys.’

Items that will be available in the short term include an as yet unseen collection of commemorative china from the Royal Collection Trust.

The designs will not be unveiled until after the birth and confirmation of the baby’s sex and production is not likely to be completed until after the baby has been named.

For George in July 2013, the Royal Collection produced items including a pillbox (£30), a small loving cup (£39), a dessert plate (£45) and a limited-edition loving cup (£195).

More commemorative mugs will come from the Staffordshire potteries, who, along with Emma Bridgewater, traditionally mark royal events.

The Royal Mint is also to produce a celebratory £5 coin – again repeating the routine after Prince George’s birth when it produced 10,000 silver crown-sized £5 coins.

Each one cost £80 while a further 2,013 22-carat gold sovereigns, all featuring St. George, were sold for £800 apiece.  

Xmas Holidays

Beatles fans can now take digital tour of Abbey Road studios using Google Street View

  • The world famous studios have never before been open to the public
  • But in a Google first the web giant has made an app with a virtual tour
  • Includes archived Beatles photos and music videos of stars at the studio
  • Users navigate round in the same way that Google Street View works

By

Sam Tonkin For Mailonline


Published:
04:17 EST, 15 April 2015

|
Updated:
08:42 EST, 15 April 2015

It has the most famous zebra crossing in the world outside it, and has hosted every major name in music in the last 80 years, but Abbey Road studios has never before been open to the public.

Despite receiving around 500,000 visitors a year, mostly to walk the famous crossing, the studio doors have been shut to those not recording ever since 1931 – that is, until now, thanks to a new collaboration with Google.

The result is Inside Abbey Road, a new web app that takes users on an interactive, immersive and hugely detailed virtual tour of the inner workings of Abbey Road.

Scroll down for video 

Fine-tuning: The interactive app shows sound engineers and producers working as they look into Studio 1

Fine-tuning: The interactive app shows sound engineers and producers working as they look into Studio 1

Classical music legend Sir Edward Elgar opened the studios on 12th November 1931. A video of him leading the London Symphony Orchestra in a rendition of Land of Hope and Glory can be seen in Studio 1 (pictured)

Classical music legend Sir Edward Elgar opened the studios on 12th November 1931. A video of him leading the London Symphony Orchestra in a rendition of Land of Hope and Glory can be seen in Studio 1 (pictured)

Jamming: The Beatles on pianos in Studio 1 in 1967. John Lennon (left), Ringo Starr (middle) and Paul McCartney (right) play while George Harrison sits in the background

Jamming: The Beatles on pianos in Studio 1 in 1967. John Lennon (left), Ringo Starr (middle) and Paul McCartney (right) play while George Harrison sits in the background

The studios hosted the world’s first live global broadcast – from none other than The Beatles – as well as playing a role in the invention of stereo by EMI engineer Alan Blumlein.

With the aim of sharing some of this history, Google has stepped in to showcase as much of it to the public as possible, in a range of ways.

Those familiar with Google Street View will find plenty they are used to in the way Inside Abbey Road is navigated, with a point and click of the mouse, as well as click and drag to scan the more than 150 360-degree images that make up the experience.

But these are only the top layer to the app, which then has several animated sequences in place of images that show sound technicians at work in the three studios and mastering suite.

Then added to this are a range of information points in the form of short articles on subjects ranging from cutting vinyl records to creating stereo.

History: There are archive photos from Abbey Road down the years, as well as YouTube videos (pictured next to the piano) of performances placed in the exact spot they were filmed from. This image shows Studio 3

History: There are archive photos from Abbey Road down the years, as well as YouTube videos (pictured next to the piano) of performances placed in the exact spot they were filmed from. This image shows Studio 3

Paul McCartney, Ringo Starr and John Lennon arrive at Abbey Road studios for the recording of All You Need is Love on 24th June 1967
Cliff Richard recording his single Livin' Doll on 28th April 1958

Paul McCartney, Ringo Starr and John Lennon (left) arrive at Abbey Road studios for the recording of All You Need is Love on 24th June 1967. Cliff Richard (right) recording his single Livin’ Doll on 28th April 1958

View from the outside: More than 500,000 people knock on the doors of Abbey Road studios every year only to be told that it is closed to the public

View from the outside: More than 500,000 people knock on the doors of Abbey Road studios every year only to be told that it is closed to the public

Recording live: One of the rooms where musicians can record their music at the world famous studios

Recording live: One of the rooms where musicians can record their music at the world famous studios

Mixing songs: Sound engineers and producers sit in this room as artists record in the studio in front of them

Mixing songs: Sound engineers and producers sit in this room as artists record in the studio in front of them

Sneak peak: The Inside Abbey Road web app takes users on an interactive, immersive and hugely detailed virtual tour of the inner workings of Abbey Road studios

Sneak peak: The Inside Abbey Road web app takes users on an interactive, immersive and hugely detailed virtual tour of the inner workings of Abbey Road studios

THE ICONIC ALBUM COVER

Abbey Road zebra crossing in St John’s Wood, London, rose to fame after The Beatles posed on it for the cover of their eleventh studio album, titled Abbey Road, in 1969.

The image, shot by Iain Macmillan, shows John Lennon, Paul McCartney, George Harrison and Ringo Starr walking over the crossing.

Since then, hundreds of thousands of tourists have flocked to Abbey Road to recreate the iconic image.

In December 2010, the crossing given Grade II-listed status for its ‘cultural and historical importance’.

There are archive photos from Abbey Road down the years, as well as YouTube videos of performances that are placed in the exact spot they were filmed from.

These include music videos from the likes of Take That, Kate Bush and Bastille, as well as an interview between Zane Lowe and Jay Z.

Giles Martin, a producer based at Abbey Road for artists like Paul McCartney, and whose father Sir George Martin produced The Beatles, said: ‘Abbey Road Studios has been a hive of creativity and source of world-class recordings for more than 80 years.

‘The artists using the studios have sold countless millions of records and have helped create popular culture as we know it today. It’s an inspirational place and an honour for me to work there today.

‘This collaboration with Google gives the outside world a great insight into the everyday workings of the studio and allows anyone to glimpse the magic that goes on inside the world’s most famous recording studio.’

Inside Studio 1: Among the artists who recorded here are Kanye West, Paul Simon and Professor Green

Inside Studio 1: Among the artists who recorded here are Kanye West, Paul Simon and Professor Green

Following in their footsteps: The famous zebra crossing outside Abbey Road studios. The cast of West End Beatles show Let it Be (pictured) celebrated the 45th anniversary of The Beatles at Abbey Road last August

Following in their footsteps: The famous zebra crossing outside Abbey Road studios. The cast of West End Beatles show Let it Be (pictured) celebrated the 45th anniversary of The Beatles at Abbey Road last August

Thousands of Beatles fans from far and wide come to Abbey Road every year to sign their name
Tourists walking across the zebra crossing outside Abbey Road recording studios

Thousands of Beatles fans from far and wide come to Abbey Road every year to sign their name (left) and walk across the zebra crossing outside Abbey Road recording studios (right)

Tom Seymour, the head of Google’s Creative Lab, said: ‘We’re always looking at how we can use technology to bring people closer to cultural icons and institutions around the world.

‘With Inside Abbey Road, we wanted to open the doors to the iconic music studio for anyone in the world to step inside and experience the stories, the sounds, the people and the equipment that make Abbey Road Studios what it is today.’

There are also guided tours voiced by producer Mr Martin, as well as from DJ and presenter Lauren Laverne and Abbey Road studios’ head of audio products Mirek Stiles.

Performers: Music videos from the likes of Sam Smith (pictured), Take That, Kate Bush and Bastille can be played by users as they make their way round

Performers: Music videos from the likes of Sam Smith (pictured), Take That, Kate Bush and Bastille can be played by users as they make their way round

The app works in the same way as Google Street View, with visitors navigating their way around with a point and click of the mouse, enabling them to scan more than 150 360-degree images that make up the experience

The app works in the same way as Google Street View, with visitors navigating their way around with a point and click of the mouse, enabling them to scan more than 150 360-degree images that make up the experience

Fly on the wall: One of the videos in the experience is an interview between presenter Zane Lowe and Jay Z

Fly on the wall: One of the videos in the experience is an interview between presenter Zane Lowe and Jay Z

THE HISTORY OF ABBEY ROAD STUDIOS: RECORDING HITS SINCE 1931

Ringo Starr and George Harrison from The Beatles arrive at Abbey Road studios in November 1966. The band recorded around 90 per cent of their music there between 1962 and 1970

Ringo Starr and George Harrison from The Beatles arrive at Abbey Road studios in November 1966. The band recorded around 90 per cent of their music there between 1962 and 1970

Abbey Road studios was opened on 12th November 1931 by classical music legend Sir Edward Elgar. The first custom-built studio complex of its kind, Elgar used it in its early years to record some of his famous pieces.

The facility had been fashioned out of a 16-room residence at 3 Abbey Road, St. John’s Wood which had been bought by record company EMI in 1929.

It has three recording studios and has been used by every major name in music over the last 80 years. 

Studio one can play host to a 110-piece orchestra and 100-person choir simultaneously and has been used by the London Symphony Orchestra and the Glenn Miller Orchestra among others. 

In June 1962 The Beatles made their first recording there in what was the start of an artistic collaboration that would last until 1970 when the group split. In total, around 90 per cent of the legendary band’s music was recorded at Abbey Road studios.

Five years after recording there for the first time,history was made when a worldwide satellite television link-uip was broadcast from the studio of The Beatles performing All You Need is Love live. An estimated 350 million people listened to the broadcast.

Among the famous artists to have recorded at Abbey Road are the Spice Girls, Pink Floyd, Cliff Richard, Queen and Shirley Bassey.

Hundreds of thousands of Beatles fans make their way to the studios every year and many of the walls and signs in the vicinity of the building are covered with Beatles-themed graffiti.

In 2010 rumours began circling that cash-strapped EMI were looking to sell the studios. A year later the company sold its recorded music division for £1.2billion to the French-owned Universal Music Group.

Because it is a working studio it is closed to the public. But now, thanks to Google’s new web app, music fans can enjoy and interactive, virtual tour of the building. 

One of the most eye-catching moments within the app is the animated panorama that places users at the centre of the London Symphony Orchestra as they perform in one of the studios.

Google is calling the new site a continuation of their tradition of creating tools which help users see and experience things they would never have had access to otherwise.

It follows in the footsteps of the Pyramids of Giza being added to Google Street View, and the Google Cultural Institute’s work on Vincent Van Gogh.

Hidden treasure: Abbey Road Studios has hosted every major name in music in the last 80 years but has never been open to the public because it is a working studio, despite receiving 500,000 visitors a year trying to get in

Hidden treasure: Abbey Road studios has hosted every major name in music in the last 80 years but because it is a working studio it has never been open to the public, despite receiving 500,000 visitors a year

Interactive: With the aim of sharing some of this history, Google has stepped in to showcase as much of it to the public as possible in a range of different ways 

Interactive: With the aim of sharing some of this history, Google has stepped in to showcase as much of it to the public as possible in a range of different ways 

Front row seat: One of the most eye-catching moments within the app is the animated panorama that places users at the centre of the London Symphony Orchestra as they perform in one of the studios 

Front row seat: One of the most eye-catching moments within the app is the animated panorama that places users at the centre of the London Symphony Orchestra as they perform in one of the studios 

There are also some gaming-style interactions to play with, including the J37 track recorder that was used to record Sgt Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band – which can be interacted with to create your own version of audio tracks, to try to match against the original.

For music fans, there is a huge amount of detail and history to be unearthed from using the new app, and for general users there is the ability to use it across devices, and probably find out something new in the process.

Users can try the experience by visiting insideabbeyroad.withgoogle.com.

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Police ‘identify Hatton Garden suspect’ and heist may have been inspired by 1980s LA gang

  • Officers thought to have identified supposed ringleader of jewel thieves 
  • Meanwhile criminologist suspects raid was inspired by plot of crime novel
  • Novel is based on real-life bank heists carried out the late 80s in LA
  • Hole In The Ground Gang used drills to bore into vaults in 1986 and 87

By

Chris Pleasance for MailOnline


Published:
04:51 EST, 14 April 2015

|
Updated:
09:47 EST, 14 April 2015

Police are believed to have identified one of the men behind the jewel heist in Hatton Garden, as it was revealed the gang could have been inspired by similar robberies in Los Angeles in the 1980s.

Officers from Scotland Yard’s Flying Squad released images of three suspects on Saturday, but refused to release a picture of the supposed ringleader, likely because he has already been identified.

Meanwhile criminologist Richard Hoskins said he has identified ‘startling similarities’ between the Hatton Garden raid and novel Black Echo, by Michael Connelly.

Scroll down for video 

Police are believed to have identified one of the Hatton Garden raiders after releasing CCTV images of the gang as they raided the bank vault over the Easter bank holiday

Officers released images of three of the men, but refused to release an images of the supposed ringleader, which is believed to be because he has already been identified

Officers released images of three of the men, but refused to release an images of the supposed ringleader, which is believed to be because he has already been identified

The novel was based on real-life bank robbers dubbed ‘The Hole In The Ground Gang’ who struck three vaults in LA in 1986 and 1987, and were never caught.

In the 1986 robbery, the gang tunneled into a bank vault over a long weekend, triggering alarms on the Friday that were not investigated, before raiding safety deposit boxes stored inside the vaults.

It was not until the week following the raids that police were called and discovered the robbers had dug into the vault using heavy machinery, in very similar circumstances to the Hatton Garden raid.

Criminologist Richard Hoskins noticed 'striking similarities' between the Hatton Garden raid and crime novel Black Echo, which itself is based on two jewel heists in LA in the 1980s

Criminologist Richard Hoskins noticed ‘striking similarities’ between the Hatton Garden raid and crime novel Black Echo, which itself is based on two jewel heists in LA in the 1980s

Mr Hoskins, who also wrote murder novel The Boy in the River, told MailOnline: ‘There is obviously a lot we don’t know about the Hatton Garden heist, but on the surface they look very similar.

‘I think that when the raiders were planning their heist they must have read this book, or researched the robberies in LA.

‘While the robbery is obviously terrible for the victims, I think everyone can agree that this was a very smart operation, and Black Echo sets out a very smart way to rob a vault.

‘The timeline fits almost exactly, right down to the alarm being set off on a Friday and the break in being discovered on a Tuesday.’

The Hole In The Ground Gang first struck in 1986, when they tunneled underneath a First Interstate Bank located along famous Sunset Boulevard near Hollywood, in LA.

The gang, believed to number around four or five, made a hole in the wall of a storm drain underneath LA’s streets, before tunneling 100ft through the dirt, emerging underneath the bank vault. 

They then used concrete drills and saws to cut a 20ft-by-25ft hole in the floor of the vault, before clambering through and ransacking the safety deposit boxes.

In total they got away with $270,000 in cash, along with the contents of 36 deposit boxes, worth up to $2.5million. One box contained a sketch of a young girl by Henri Matisse.

The crew had stashed quadbikes underground for a quick escape, but the raid was in fact not discovered until the start of the following week when staff arrived to find the vault ransacked.

Police then discovered the tunnel, littered with ‘an enormous number’ of polystyrene coffee cups, and surmised that the raiders were probably sewer or construction workers who had decided to turn their skills to a sinister new use.

Nobody was ever traced for the crime, and in 1987 the same group struck again, this time at a Bank of America in another LA neighbourhood.

In both Hatton Garden and the LA raids, the gangs bored into vaults using heavy drills (pictured), broke in over a long weekend, set off an alarm on the Friday that wasn't checked out, and raided safety deposit boxes

In both Hatton Garden and the LA raids, the gangs bored into vaults using heavy drills (pictured), broke in over a long weekend, set off an alarm on the Friday that wasn’t checked out, and raided safety deposit boxes

The LA raiders became known as the Hole In The Ground Gang, and Mr Hoskins believes the group who raided Hatton Garden (picutred) must have known about them, or read the book inspired by them

The LA raiders became known as the Hole In The Ground Gang, and Mr Hoskins believes the group who raided Hatton Garden (picutred) must have known about them, or read the book inspired by them

Again, the group had used heavy tools to cut their way into a bank vault over the course of a weekend, and again they had set off an alarm on their way in.

However, on this occasion police did respond, and they were forced to flee with just $89,000 and without cracking a single safety deposit box.

It was only afterwards the officers discovered another tunnel underneath Union Federal Savings and Loan in Beverly Hills, suggesting the gang were attempting to hit two vaults at once.

Mr Connelly told The Times: ‘The Black Echo was a fictionalised account of a bank heist that occurred in LA in September 1987. It was never solved.’

In the Hatton Garden raid, the Met Police have said the raiders broke into the building on the second floor, disabling the lift before lowering themselves down the shaft and breaking into the basement.

The men then climbed back up to the ground floor to let other gang members in through a side entrance, before all making their way to the vaults where they drilled their way inside.

The raiders then broke into 72 safety deposit boxes, before making their getaway in a white Ford Transit van parked outside. 

The diamond-tipped drills were taken from a building site in Fetter Lane, an eight minute walk from Hatton Garden, and nobody was ever arrested.

Police are probing the thefts of several drills in the months before the raid, including two Hilti drills that were taken near Hatton Garden. DCI Paul Johnson (pictured) has previously said Hilti drills were used in the raid

Police are probing the thefts of several drills in the months before the raid, including two Hilti drills that were taken near Hatton Garden. DCI Paul Johnson (pictured) has previously said Hilti drills were used in the raid

City of London Police also confirmed today that they have passed information to Scotland Yard about the theft of two Hilti drills, the same devices used in the Hatton Garden raid, in December last year. 

In another development, The Sun has revealed that £80,000 worth of diamond tipped drills were stolen from another site in South London in November, using a van similar to that at Hatton Garden.

Andrew Royce, of Elmcrest Diamond Drilling, revealed that the equipment could easily be used to cut into a vault, as his firm is often tasked with converting former banks into hotels and housing. 

CCTV from the scene reveals that a white Transit Van parked outside his business for two minutes in November last year before two hooded men are seen walking past

 

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