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Christmas Trees are coming! Be Prepared this December

Types of Christmas Trees

There are various types of Christmas trees available, and you must choose the one that is perfect for your home during the holiday season. There are various types, as you will see below:

Nordman Fir

The Norman Fir Christmas Tree barely drops its needles, making it the most popular choice in Modern times, due to the safety issues related to children and pets, and the sharp Christmas tree needles. They come in a range of shapes and sizes, and their needles are a lot fleshier.

Norway Spruce

The Norway Spruce Christmas tree, brings the classic smell of childhood to your home. Its needles do drop a lot more than other varieties, but it more than makes up for that with its beautiful smell, and really traditional tall and narrow shape.

Potted Christmas Trees

The Potted Christmas tree is a great choice if you would prefer your tree to last longer than just a few weeks, as potted trees are more likely to live on through the year, and be fine to use again a year later. The come in both varieties, the Nordman or Norway Spruce, and are often a little cheaper.

Where to buy a Christmas Tree

You can normally buy Christmas trees at your local garden centre, or check online for your nearest Christmas tree farm. Sapcote Garden Centre, Leicester, LE94LG, 01455 274049, (http://www.sapcotegc.co.uk/christmas/christmas-trees) has a range of Nordman Fir, and Norway Spruce Christmas trees for sale, and the price is the same as 2012.

Christmas gifts 2014: the best presents for younger children

The Napier Runner bicycle designed by Sir Chris Hoy
The Napier Runner bicycle designed by Sir Chris Hoy Photo: FULL STOP

By Amy Bryant, Elfreda Pownall

6:32PM GMT 21 Nov 2014

Whether you’re buying for family or friends, shopping for young or old,
searching for stocking fillers or for the ultimate christmas
gift, we’ve got all bases covered.

Discerning foodies are catered for, and
tech-savvy teens
are in for a treat.

Our gifts for the home cover on-trend
pastels and pattern, while fans of monochrome and metallics will find plenty
to please.

Children can play and invent, and
there are chocolate gifts to suit
all palates (if you can bear to give them away).

Read on for the best gifts to give to children for Christmas 2014…

Wooden block set, £29.95, by Paul Thurlby, from Wild
& Wolf

Make Your Own Doll gift box, £69 each, by Makies

Yummy Donut bean bag, £89.99, by Woouf!, from Find
Me A Gift

LeapBand, £29.99, by LeapFrog

Napier Runner bike, £110, by Hoy, From Evans
Cycles

N-Strike Elite Demolisher 2-in-1 Blaster, £39.99, by Nerf, from Amazon

Blossom rocking-horse, £69.95, by Mamas
& Papas

Junior Carpenter toolbox, £23, bu Bigjigs, from Mulberry
Bush

Interactive toy, £79.99, by Xeno, from Argos

Christmas Trees

Christmas gifts 2014: top technology and gadgets

Flash, £32, by Misfit
Flash, £32, by Misfit Photo: FULL STOP

By Matt Warman

6:37PM GMT 21 Nov 2014

Whether you’re buying for family or friends, shopping for young or old,
searching for stocking fillers or for the ultimate christmas
gift, we’ve got all bases covered.

Discerning foodies are catered for, and
tech-savvy teens
are in for a treat.

Our gifts for the home cover on-trend
pastels and pattern, while fans of monochrome and metallics will find plenty
to please.

Children can play and invent, and
there are chocolate gifts to suit
all palates (if you can bear to give them away).

Read on for the top technology presents for Christmas 2014…

Flash (above), £32, by Misfit
An unusually affordable piece of wearable tech, the Flash will track your
sleep and exercise. And with seven colours available, it can go with any
style

iPad Air 2, from £399, by Apple
Thinner than ever, the iPad remains the best tablet on the market. The device
vanishes into the background, drawing you into its immersive screen

SoundTrue on-ear headphones, £129.95, by Bose
Lightweight and brightly coloured, these headphones are the perfect
compromise between portability and sound quality, and they come with a
protective case

Moto X, from £419.99, by Motorola
Currently the best ambassador for Google’s Android phones, the Moto X can be
controlled by your voice and built to order, wooden back and all

Sanctuary4, £79, by Bluelounge
Nobody likes waking up to a mess of cables on the bedside cabinet. The
Sanctuary4 brings order to such chaos

Hudl 2, £129, by Tesco
Apples are not the only fruit: if surfing the web, watching films and
checking your email are all you need a tablet for, the Hudl 2 is the best
option for the price

Finistr, £199, by Ted
Baker

Lots of fashion brands make “lifestyle” products, but Ted Baker takes it
seriously. This is a DAB radio with Bluetooth, great looks and good sound

Kindle Voyage, from £169, by Amazon
E-readers may seem commonplace now, but Amazon has been evolving the Kindle
for seven years. The Voyage has seemingly limitless battery life and a
beautiful screen

AeroBull iPod dock, £1,020, by Jarre
Technologies

Music deserves to look as good as it sounds – and what could look better than
a dog-shaped iPod dock and a bone-shaped remote control?

Christmas Trees

Christmas gifts 2014: perfect presents for older children

The MiniDrone Rolling Spider by Parrot
The MiniDrone Rolling Spider by Parrot Photo: FULL STOP PHOTOGRAPHY

By Elfreda Pownall & Amy Bryant

6:36PM GMT 21 Nov 2014

Whether you’re buying for family or friends, shopping for young or old,
searching for stocking fillers or for the ultimate christmas
gift, we’ve got all bases covered.

Discerning foodies are catered for, and
tech-savvy teens
are in for a treat.

Our gifts for the home cover on-trend
pastels and pattern, while fans of monochrome and metallics will find plenty
to please.

Children can play and invent, and
there are chocolate gifts to suit
all palates (if you can bear to give them away).

Read on for the top teen presents for Christmas 2014…

MiniDrone Rolling Spider (above), £89.99, by Parrot, from Amazon

PEN E-PL7 camera, £499.95, by Olympus, from John
Lewis

BeoPlay H6 Bronzed Hazel headphones, £329, by B&O
Play

Street Candy Colour helmet, £24.99, by Lazer

Laptop cases, £35 each, by Rude

DJControlWave, £239.99, by Hercules, from Amazon

3D pencil cases, from £10 each, by Fakkus, from The
Conran Shop

Freak Out Beanie knitting-kit, £37.50, by Wool
and the Gang

Christmas Trees

SAS quad bike squads kill up to 8 jihadis each day as allies prepare to wipe IS off the map

  • Targets are identified by drones operated by SAS soldiers
  • Who are then dropped into IS territory by helicopter to stage attacks
  • The surprise ambushes are said to be ‘putting the fear of God into IS’
  • The raids are attacking IS’s main supply routes across western Iraq 

By

Mark Nicol for The Mail on Sunday


Published:
17:01 EST, 22 November 2014

|
Updated:
08:18 EST, 23 November 2014

SAS troops with sniper rifles and heavy machine guns have killed hundreds of Islamic State extremists in a series of deadly quad-bike ambushes inside Iraq, The Mail on Sunday can reveal.

Defence sources indicated last night that soldiers from the elite fighting unit have eliminated ‘up to eight terrorists per day’ in the daring raids, carried out during the past four weeks.

Until now, it had been acknowledged only that the SAS was operating in a reconnaissance role in Iraq and was not involved in combat. But The Mail on Sunday has learned that small groups of soldiers are being dropped into IS territory in RAF Chinook helicopters – to take on the enemy.

Scroll down for video 

DRONES PATROL IRAQ TO SEEK OUT TARGETS: Drone operators study footage of the terrorists’ positions which are then relayed to SAS commanders at their secret base so they can plan missions

DRONES PATROL IRAQ TO SEEK OUT TARGETS: Drone operators study footage of the terrorists’ positions which are then relayed to SAS commanders at their secret base so they can plan missions

Targets are identified by drones operated either from an SAS base or by the soldiers themselves on the ground, who use smaller devices.

The troops are also equipped with quad bikes – four-wheeled all-terrain vehicles that can have machine guns bolted on to a frame. They then seek out IS units and attack the terrorists using the element of surprise and under the cover of darkness.

The missions have taken place on a near daily basis in the past four weeks and the SAS soldiers have expended so much ammunition that regimental quartermasters have been forced to order a full replenishment of stocks of machine-gun rounds and sniper bullets.

An SAS source said: ‘Our tactics are putting the fear of God into IS as they don’t know where we’re going to strike next and there’s frankly nothing they can do to stop us.

SAS SNIPER UNITS SCRAMBLED IN CHINOOKS: The heavily equipped troops are flown deep into IS territory aboard RAF transport helicopters, their quad bikes stowed on board, before touching down 50 miles from their target

SAS SNIPER UNITS SCRAMBLED IN CHINOOKS: The heavily equipped troops are flown deep into IS territory aboard RAF transport helicopters, their quad bikes stowed on board, before touching down 50 miles from their target

‘We’re degrading their morale. They can run and hide if they see planes in the sky but they can’t see or hear us. Using so many snipers takes the fear factor to another level too; the terrorists don’t know what’s happening. They just see their colleagues lying dead in the sand.’

The SAS’s guerrilla-style raids are targeting IS’s main supply routes across western Iraq and vehicle checkpoints set up by the terrorists to conduct kidnappings and extort money from local drivers.

The operations start with SAS commanders studying hours of footage of potential target sites recorded by drones – Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) – and listening to enemy communication intercepts in a bid to identify IS leaders.

Once the regiment’s senior officers have identified a target, the soldiers gather to receive their operational orders. They then leave their secret base and climb aboard a fleet of helicopters – with the quad bikes already safely secured in the cargo hold.

As the SAS soldiers strap themselves into their seats, the pilots tap in the co-ordinates for the area of desert where the Chinook will land.

As the helicopters’ engines are so loud, the Chinooks take the SAS soldiers to a laying-up point as far as 50 miles from the target. The troops disembark aboard the quad bikes and prepare their general- purpose machine guns (GPMGs) and Barrett sniper rifles.

IS PICKED OFF IN GUERILLA-STYLE RAIDS: Using precision sniper rifles, machine guns and surprise tactics, the SAS take out their IS targets before disappearing back into the desert

IS PICKED OFF IN GUERILLA-STYLE RAIDS: Using precision sniper rifles, machine guns and surprise tactics, the SAS take out their IS targets before disappearing back into the desert

The SAS’s raids are intended to degrade Islamic State’s fighting capability ahead of a spring offensive by 20,000 Iraqi and Kurdish troops next year, with the UK providing additional training for these soldiers.

In the next fortnight, Defence Secretary Michael Fallon is expected to receive a report from British military planners setting out what needs to be done.

The plans could see up to 300 UK trainers leading a programme of intensive training for the Kurds and Iraqis, with an emphasis on infantry drills and techniques to defuse enemy explosive devices.

When the spring offensive starts, British trainers may remain with the Iraqi and Kurdish units but are not expected to get directly involved in the fighting.

Earlier this month, Mr Fallon held meetings with political leaders in the region, assuring them that the UK was committed to defeating IS and improving the training of their soldiers.

The Defence Secretary also visited Kuwait, where it is expected that US and British commanders will set up a spring offensive planning centre.

The mission to defeat the 200,000-strong IS forces will be led by a senior US officer, Lieutenant General James Terry. It is likely that his second in command will be a senior British officer, Lieutenant General Tom Beckett.

Next month Lieut Gen Beckett will take over as Defence Senior Adviser for the Middle East (DSAME), a post vacated by Lieutenant General Simon Mayall, who is retiring after four years in the role.

Defence sources indicated last night that soldiers from the elite fighting unit have eliminated ‘up to eight terrorists per day’ in the daring raids, carried out during the past four weeks

Defence sources indicated last night that soldiers from the elite fighting unit have eliminated ‘up to eight terrorists per day’ in the daring raids, carried out during the past four weeks

But Middle East experts are questioning whether the UK’s strategy to defeat IS stands any chance of success. Professor Gareth Stansfield from Exeter University told The Mail on Sunday: ‘Not only is the Islamic State stronger than previous organisations, it has also learned lessons from them.

‘For example, IS has few fixed operational centres and its chain of command remains mobile. British policy options at this stage are burdened with problems and complications and also bring with them a range of unintended consequences that could draw Western powers into further engagements in the region.

‘With regard to the spring offensive, the Kurds would not be able to push further south into Iraq without upsetting the Sunni tribesmen in these areas and the Iraqi army is regarded as a Shia militia. So we are a long way off a practical solution to the problem of IS.’

The Mail on Sunday has learned that since IS began its campaign in Syria and Iraq, more than 35 British jihadists have lost their lives. It is believed the most recent UK citizens to die fighting for the extremists – known as Abu Abdullah al-Habashi, 21, and Abu Dharda, 20 – were from London. They are understood to have been killed in US air strikes on the Syrian border town of Kobane.

Our tactics are putting the fear of God into IS 

Al-Habashi grew up in North London in a British-Eritrean family and converted to Islam when he was 16. In August, al-Habashi told the BBC he had gone to Syria nine months earlier and had been fighting both there and in Iraq. Al-Habashi is thought to have appeared in at least two IS videos posted online.

Dharda comes from a British-Somali background and grew up in West London. He travelled to Syria in December 2013, entering via Turkey. It is believed that Dharda was questioned by counter-terrorism police at a British airport as he left but was allowed on his journey because they were satisfied with the explanation he gave for the purpose of his trip.

Intelligence sources have indicated that more than 500 Britons are currently fighting for IS, with the vast majority active in Syria.

Yesterday, the widow of murdered British aid worker Alan Henning told a memorial service he was killed ‘for being what we should be, selfless and caring’.

A video showing the beheading of the 47-year-old taxi driver was released by IS last month.

A private memorial service at Eccles parish church in Greater Manchester was held yesterday, with audio relayed outside.

His widow Barbara and daughter Lucy walked in with Bethany and Michael Haines, the daughter and brother of David Haines from Scone, Scotland, also murdered by IS.

Mrs Henning told the memorial: ‘We must never forget the reason why he went to Syria and the reason he was taken from us – for being what we all should be, selfless and caring.’

Meanwhile, IS militants have killed at least 25 members of a Sunni Muslim tribe in a village on the eastern edge of Ramadi in Iraq, in apparent revenge for tribal opposition to the radical Islamists.

Local officials said the bodies of the men from the Albu Fahd tribe were discovered by the Iraqi army when it launched a counter-offensive on Saturday against IS near Ramadi, capital of Anbar province.

‘Red Cap tragedy’ General set to lead offensive 

NEW MAN: Lieut General Tom Beckett

NEW MAN: Lieut General Tom Beckett

A former Parachute Regiment officer who was in charge of six Red Caps brutally killed by a mob of extremists in Iraq is in line to become the second in command of coalition operations against IS.

Lieutenant General Tom Beckett has been appointed Defence Senior Adviser for the Middle East (DSAME) and will take up his position as the UK steps up its efforts to train Iraqi and Kurdish forces to defeat Islamic State.

Softly spoken Lieut Gen Beckett first deployed to Iraq in 2003, when the tragedy of the Red Caps marked the beginning of an insurgency against the British presence in the country’s southern provinces. At the time, the Red Caps, or Royal Military Policemen, were attached to the Parachute Regiment’s 1st Battalion led by Beckett. Eleven years on, families of the Red Caps still blame senior officers for their deaths.

Lieut Gen Beckett is taking over as DSAME following the retirement of Lieutenant General Simon Mayall – an officer who was considered the British Army’s leading expert on Arab affairs. Lieut Gen Mayall served as DSAME for four years but his retirement comes only three months after the Prime Minister also appointed him to serve as his special envoy to Kurdistan – a key role during the IS crisis. Last night, Middle East expert Professor Gareth Stansfield described Lieut Gen Mayall’s retirement as a ‘blow’ because of his understanding of regional politics and jihad philosophy.

 

Xmas Holidays

Claudia Winkleman returns to Strictly Come Dancing as daughter recovers from Halloween burns

By

Chris Hastings for The Mail on Sunday


Published:
14:57 EST, 22 November 2014

|
Updated:
08:17 EST, 23 November 2014

Claudia Winkleman received a standing ovation when she made her emotional return to Strictly Come Dancing following her daughter’s horrific Halloween accident.

The studio audience, which contained several celebrities including Great British Bake Off star Mary Berry, gave the presenter a rapturous reception as she was escorted on to the set by professional dancer Anton du Beke.

Winkleman was clearly moved by the reception which she described as ‘amazing’.

Scroll down for video 

She's back: Claudia Winkleman (left) made a sensational return to Strictly Come Dancing as she joined Tess Daly (right) on Saturday night

She’s back: Claudia Winkleman (left) made a sensational return to Strictly Come Dancing as she joined Tess Daly (right) on Saturday night

The 42-year-old thanked Zoe Ball for standing in for her as Tess Daly’s co-host, and added: ‘It’s wonderful to be here.’ 

She also thanked the production team for bringing her a present back from Blackpool, where the show was recorded last week.

Viewers didn’t get to see the gift but instead heard a sound effect of a donkey. Winkleman said ‘Brian’ was the perfect gift and ‘what I’ve always wanted’.

Fans immediately took to Twitter to describe her return as touching and moving, with some saying they were close to tears. 

'It is wonderful to be here,' the 42-year-old presenter told the audience, before adding: 'A huge thank you to Zoe for stepping in'

‘It is wonderful to be here,’ the 42-year-old presenter told the audience, before adding: ‘A huge thank you to Zoe for stepping in’

The presenter had been off for three weeks, spending her time at the bedside of eight-year-old Matilda who suffered serious burns while she was out trick-or-treating. 

It was reported that her costume was set alight by a candle and burned her legs. Matilda is understood to have now been discharged from hospital.

Before her return, Winkleman, who is married to film producer Kris Thykier, said: ‘I’m coming back to Strictly this weekend but am out of practice so please bear with me.’

Strictly stars: The 42-year-old presenter has broken her silence on Twitter to announce she is returning to the BBC One dance contest

Strictly stars: The 42-year-old presenter has broken her silence on Twitter to announce she is returning to the BBC One dance contest

The mother of three added: ‘A huge thank you to the incredible NHS doctors and nurses who are being extraordinary. We are bowled over by their kindness and brilliance.

‘Matilda is doing well and although it will be a long road to recovery she is getting the best possible care. Thank you so much for your lovely messages they meant everything.’

Breaks her silence: Claudia took to her Twitter page to update fans on her daughter's progress and announce her return to Strictly Come Dancing

Breaks her silence: Claudia took to her Twitter page to update fans on her daughter’s progress and announce her return to Strictly Come Dancing

Injured: Matilda, pictured with her father Kris Thykier, was hurt after her Halloween costume caught fire in an accident on Halloween night

Injured: Matilda, pictured with her father Kris Thykier, was hurt after her Halloween costume caught fire in an accident on Halloween night

Stand-in: It Takes Two host Zoe Ball (left) has filled in for Claudia over the past two weeks

Stand-in: It Takes Two host Zoe Ball (left) has filled in for Claudia over the past two weeks

Support: Claudia and husband Kris Thykier have been by their daughter's bedside for the past two weeks

Support: Claudia and husband Kris Thykier have been by their daughter’s bedside for the past two weeks

Xmas Holidays

How well do you know your Christmas jumpers? Quiz

Pharrell Williams fired the starting gun for christmas jumper season this week, wearing a fuzzy blue jumper with a stylish moose motif. With sales already up 160% year-on-year at Asda, ridiculous knits are truly part of fashion’s festive vernacular. But can you recognise some classics of the genre?

Christmas Trees

Game of Thrones gets 12 days of Christmas treatment on Sky Atlantic

On the twelfth day of christmas, my true love gave to me …

12 random sex scenes,

11 bearskin coats,

10 topless women,

Nine scenes of torture,

Eight scheming henchmen,

Seven kingdoms of Westeros,

Six shocking plot twists,

FIVE … original books!

Four counts of incest,

Three flying dragons,

Two surprise beheadings,

… and one really weird one-eyed crow!

(NB: Monkey would not bet a bunch of bananas on the accuracy of these numbers …)

Christmas Trees

Tropical Christmas pudding with vanilla bean zesty glaze recipe

Tropical <a href='http://www.refernshare.com' target='_blank'>christmas</a> pudding
Taste of Mauritius: the tropical Christmas pudding 

Selina Periampillai is a British-born Mauritian chef and food writer, who
specialises in the exotic and tantalising flavours of Mauritian cuisine.
This is her favourite Christmas pudding recipe.

SERVES
6-8

COOKING TIME
2hours

INGREDIENTS

For the pudding
50g self raising flour
100g light suet, shredded, or unsalted softened butter
200g light brown muscavado sugar
1tsp mixed spice
1/2tsp cinnamon
100g white breadcrumbs
150g dried fruit (try tropical fruits like pineapple, banana, mango) soaked
overnight preferably in Mauritian rum & chopped roughly (I used Urban
Fruit)
1 apple, grated coarsely
125ml Mauritian rum, either white or spiced
2 eggs, beaten
100g macadamia nuts, roughly chopped

For the vanilla glaze
100g icing sugar
1 vanilla pod, seeds only (Madagascan preferably)
Zest 1/2 lime

METHOD
Place flour, breadcrumbs, spices, sugar, tropical fruit, nuts, apple and suet
in a bowl. Give it a little mix then make a well in the centre add in the
eggs and rum. Mix all the ingredients together well.

Spoon into a one litre pudding basin, top with a circle of buttered grease
proof paper and cover with a a double layer sheet of foil over the top and
scrunched around the rim of the basin. Using kitchen string, tie around the
top to secure the foil.

Place the basin on a trivet or upside-down saucer in a large saucepan of water
(with water reaching halfway up the sides of the pudding bowl), bring to the
boil, cover with a tight-fitting lid and turn down to a simmer for 1.5-2
hours. Top up with boiling water if needed. Keep checking to make sure the
water doesn’t dry out or the pudding will burn.

Meanwhile to make the vanilla bean glaze, whisk the icing sugar, vanilla seeds
and zest together with approx 25ml-50ml water to make a pourable glaze. Set
aside.

Remove the pudding and leave to cool for 10 minutes then turn out and simply
pour over the zesty vanilla bean glaze or serve with cream.

You can also make the pudding ahead of time and leave it in a cool dry place
until Christmas.

Christmas Trees

Ultimate Christmas pudding recipe by Richard Bertinet

Richard Bertinet's Christmas pudding, all wrapped up to be sent to France
Perfect gift: Richard Bertinet’s Christmas pudding, all wrapped up to be sent to France Photo: Jean Cazals

I always send a Christmas pudding to my family in France each year and they
love it, as it is something completely different for them. The French still
don’t understand the concept.

My recipe is a little different to the traditional one, as I don’t soak the
fruit first. Instead I rest the whole pudding mixture before steaming,
during which time the fruit can plump up and infuse with the rest of the
flavours.

Although rum or brandy butter is the traditional accompaniment, most of my
family like it with cream, but I make creme anglaise for myself. The pudding
should be made at least three weeks in advance, but can be stored for upto a
year.

MAKES 1 X 2 PINT PUDDING

INGREDIENTS
100g currants
200g seedless raisins
200g sultanas
60g mixed chopped candied peel
60g glacé cherries
90g blanched almonds, sliced into slivers
&frac12; medium cooking apple, peeled, cored and coarsely chopped
&frac12; small carrot, peeled and grated
Zest and juice of &frac12; an orange
Zest and juice of &frac12; a lemon
115g finely chopped suet
115g plain flour
60g white bread or brioche crumbs
115g soft brown sugar
&frac12; teaspoon mixed spice
&frac12; teaspoon ground cinnamon
&frac14; nutmeg, grated
&frac12; teaspoon salt
3 medium eggs
&frac12; can of Guinness
2 tablespoons brandy


Old favourite: Christmas pudding (ALAMY)

METHOD
Put all of the ingredients apart from the orange and lemon juices, eggs,
Guinness and brandy in a large bowl and mix together well.

In a separate bowl, beat the eggs until frothy, then add the Guinness, brandy
and orange and lemon juices. Add to the bowl containing the rest of the
ingredients and mix well until all incorporated.

Fill your basin with the mixture, press a circle of greaseproof paper firmly
over the top and put into the fridge for at least 12 hours, but up to 48
hours.

Wipe the outside of the basin clean of any mixture, if necessary, and cover
with clingfilm. Place the pudding on a trivet in a large pan on the hob and
pour in enough boiling water to come about three quarters of the way up the
side of the basin. Bring the water back to the boil, cover the pan tightly
with a lid, and then turn down the heat and steam for 3 hours. Check the
water level regularly, and top up with boiling water from the kettle as
necessary.

Take the pan off the heat and, when cool enough to touch, carefully lift out
the pudding. Leave to cool and store, still covered in the clingfilm, until
you are ready to re-steam for another 3 hours.

To turn out, take off the clingfilm, and carefully slide a table knife around
the edge of the basin to loosen the pudding. Place a serving plate on top of
the basin and using both hands firmly grip the plate and basin and turn both
over together. The pudding should slide easily onto the plate.

To serve, warm a glass of brandy in a small pan over a low heat, ignite it
with a match and pour it while it is flaming over the pudding. Serve
immediately.

Patisserie Maison by Richard Bertinet is published by Ebury, £20

Christmas Trees