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Christmas Trees are coming! Be Prepared this December

Types of Christmas Trees

There are various types of Christmas trees available, and you must choose the one that is perfect for your home during the holiday season. There are various types, as you will see below:

Nordman Fir

The Norman Fir Christmas Tree barely drops its needles, making it the most popular choice in Modern times, due to the safety issues related to children and pets, and the sharp Christmas tree needles. They come in a range of shapes and sizes, and their needles are a lot fleshier.

Norway Spruce

The Norway Spruce Christmas tree, brings the classic smell of childhood to your home. Its needles do drop a lot more than other varieties, but it more than makes up for that with its beautiful smell, and really traditional tall and narrow shape.

Potted Christmas Trees

The Potted Christmas tree is a great choice if you would prefer your tree to last longer than just a few weeks, as potted trees are more likely to live on through the year, and be fine to use again a year later. The come in both varieties, the Nordman or Norway Spruce, and are often a little cheaper.

Where to buy a Christmas Tree

You can normally buy Christmas trees at your local garden centre, or check online for your nearest Christmas tree farm. Sapcote Garden Centre, Leicester, LE94LG, 01455 274049, (http://www.sapcotegc.co.uk/christmas/christmas-trees) has a range of Nordman Fir, and Norway Spruce Christmas trees for sale, and the price is the same as 2012.

Diabetes pump mimics the pancreas by anticipating blood sugar level

  • Device uses sensors to anticipate blood sugar levels in diabetes sufferers
  • Means patients with type 1 diabetes will be able to avoid overnight hypos
  • This is most feared complication of disease – most likely to lead to death 

By

Jenny Hope for the Daily Mail


Published:
18:12 EST, 29 March 2015

|
Updated:
04:23 EST, 30 March 2015

A new type of diabetes pump has been launched which mimics the pancreas more closely than ever 

A new type of diabetes pump has been launched which mimics the pancreas more closely than ever 

A new type of diabetes pump has been launched which mimics the pancreas more closely than ever.

The device uses sensors to anticipate blood sugar levels and suspend the delivery of insulin if those levels are going down.

The ‘predictive’ pump technology is designed to prevent blood sugar lows before they happen – unlike existing pumps that can only shut off insulin delivery afterwards.

Patients with type 1 diabetes can also avoid overnight hypos, the most feared complication of the disease and the one most likely to lead to sudden death, known as ‘Dead in Bed’ syndrome.

The new Medtronic MiniMed 640G, which costs £2,995, has been used in trials in the UK and some hospitals are now offering it to patients with severe diabetes.

Around 300,000 Britons suffer from Type 1 diabetes – a lifelong condition usually diagnosed in children or young adults – which is when the pancreas stops producing insulin.

People with diabetes must take insulin to lower their blood glucose, but food intake, stress and exercise can affect the amount of insulin required.

When insulin levels get too low, it can cause shakiness, hunger, nausea, fatigue, impaired vision, seizures, and in severe cases, even death.

High levels can, over time, lead to long-term complications such as blindness, kidney failure, cardiovascular disease and limb amputation.

Patients have to inject themselves with insulin between two and five times a day and constantly monitor their blood sugar levels by pricking their fingers and putting samples on testing strips.

But some qualify for wearable insulin pumps on the NHS that free them from having constant injections of insulin.

Dr Pratik Choudhary, Senior Lecturer and Consultant in Diabetes at King’s College London, said between 20 and 30 patients were using the new pump at his unit.

He said it was like having a car with antilock brakes to head off an accident rather than relying on an airbag once one was in progress.

People with diabetes must take insulin to lower their blood glucose, but food intake, stress and exercise can affect the amount of insulin required

People with diabetes must take insulin to lower their blood glucose, but food intake, stress and exercise can affect the amount of insulin required

He said ‘This new MiniMed 640g system represents another important step forward towards an artificial pancreas.

‘Our early experience is that patients love it for the peace of mind and safety it gives them overnight due to its ability to protect them against hypoglycaemia.

‘It will be particularly beneficial for the 5-10 per cent of type 1 patients who experience frequent serious lows or are unable to recognise lows.’

Peter Hammond, consultant diabetologist, Harrogate District Hospital, said ‘Severe hypoglycemia is so feared by many people with type 1 diabetes.

‘Attacks often occur overnight when the patient is sleeping and might be unaware or unable to react in time to prevent them. ‘This is particularly worrying for parents with young children who have the condition.

‘The MiniMed 640G is the only system able to automatically protect patients from hypoglycemia without patient interaction – safely managing type 1 diabetes overnight.

This system steers people with type 1 diabetes away from the risk of severe hypoglycaemia without them even needing to know they were in danger.’

Karen Addington, chief executive of the type 1 diabetes charity the JDRF, said ‘Type 1 diabetes is a complex and challenging condition that is on the rise in the UK. It requires intensive self-management day and night.

‘People affected by the condition – including parents of small children that have it – welcome technology that can help improve blood glucose control and bring increased peace of mind.’ 

Xmas Holidays

After Germanwings disaster, pilots CAN’T have secrets says PETER MCKAY

By

Peter McKay for the Daily Mail


Published:
18:12 EST, 29 March 2015

|
Updated:
04:23 EST, 30 March 2015

The story of the Airbus A320 co-pilot Andreas Lubitz, who deliberately flew himself, his crew and 144 passengers into the ground at 430mph — ‘vaporising’ most of them, say crash experts — is a stark reminder, as if we needed it, of our vulnerability as passengers.

There have been other reports of suicidal pilots crashing planes but none as detailed and graphic as this. Nor have we heard before about a co-pilot locking a pilot-in-command out of the cockpit, ignoring his frantic banging on the door as the airliner sped down to its destruction.

Only one feature of this chilling event is normal. The grumbling of special interest groups who seek to influence our view about what part Lubitz’s mental problems played.

Scroll down for video 

The story of the Airbus A320 co-pilot Andreas Lubitz is a stark reminder, as if we needed it, of our vulnerability as passengers

The story of the Airbus A320 co-pilot Andreas Lubitz is a stark reminder, as if we needed it, of our vulnerability as passengers

‘Don’t stigmatise depression over Alps crash’ a ‘top doctor’ tells the Observer. A headline adds: ‘Bizarre act is no basis for policy shift.’

We are told: ‘Britain’s most senior psychiatrist (Professor Simon Wessely) has warned airline authorities to avoid a kneejerk reaction to the crash . . . insisting depression should not lead to a lifetime ban for commercial airline pilots.’

European Union rules say pilots can fly if they are free of depression symptoms and on approved anti-depressants, or four weeks after the condition has been resolved.

America’s Federal Aviation Authority says depression sufferers can fly if their condition has been stable for a year under anti-depressants, namely Prozac, Zoloft, Celexa or Lexapro.

Lubitz was known to have taken a six-month rest from his flight training due to depression. This didn’t prevent him eventually qualifying as a pilot. Initially, he was employed as a cabin steward, not a pilot. Might that have been a source of grievance?

When he did get to fly, it was not with Lufthansa but for its cut-price budget offshoot, Germanwings.

Friends said his dream was to fly long-haul for Lufthansa, but this didn’t appear likely. His mental health appeared delicate, but did anyone at Lufthansa know, or care to know?

Lubitz was known to have taken a six-month rest from his flight training due to depression

Lubitz was known to have taken a six-month rest from his flight training due to depression

Police who entered his apartment found anti-depressive medication and a note from his neuropsychologist excusing him from work for a period that included the day of the crash, reports The Wall Street Journal. He ignored the advice and reported to work.

The Observer’s ‘top doctor’ Simon Wessely says: ‘Piers Morgan said that it was a disgrace that a man with acute depression was allowed to fly. Well, they are not allowed to fly. There may have been some fault in the procedure that let this happen, but they are not allowed to fly.’

Lubitz did fly. What ‘fault in the procedure’ allowed this to happen? Apparently he was able to conceal his condition from his employers because of laws guaranteeing the confidentiality of medical records.

Mental problems are easier to conceal than physical ailments. Physical screening is more rigorous than mental checks.

The dangers arising from cockpit heart attacks, or strokes, are simpler to assess than the consequences of a pilot’s mind malfunctioning.

People suffering from depression are not by definition potential mass murderers. It’s estimated that only eight cases in the past 40 years have involved suicidal pilots crashing planes containing passengers.

But known, monitored depression isn’t the same as a malady of that kind treated secretly, which seems to have been the case with Lubitz.

The secrecy provided by well-intentioned laws governing medical records is surely a bigger worry than the stigmatisation of depressive suffers.

Watching a tender love scene in Poldark, a Gogglebox Oscar Wilde quips: ‘He’s having a rummage!’ 

Watching a tender love scene in Poldark, a Gogglebox Oscar Wilde quips: ‘He’s having a rummage!’ 

How Gogglebox is mocking TV to death 

People watching TV are sometimes funnier than those appearing on it, as the series Gogglebox proves.

Their Pakistani family — dad Sid, 69, sons Umar, 36 and Baasit, 31 — make funny, cutting comments. Home Secretary Theresa May, is ‘tough on crime, tough on immigration and tough on the eyes,’ while Elizabeth Hurley, in the trash TV series Royals, looked ‘like something out of Real Wives of Cheshire’.

There was a scene in which another Gogglebox family discuss how Australians must be ‘upsides’ down,’ given their position on Earth. Why don’t they fall off the world?

Two confirmed bachelors — one in shorts — watch Trevor McDonald Meets The Mafia, in which the great man schmoozes with some alleged members of the Cosa Nostra. They wonder why Sir Trevor chooses (or is chosen) to meet such unpleasant types.

‘Why not Trevor meets Alan Titchmarsh,’ suggests one. There’s something inherently amusing about watching other people viewing TV.

The faces they make. The gaping incomprehension, the scorn. Sometimes the embarrassment mixed with excitement when sex rears its tawdry head.

Watching a tender love scene in Poldark, a Gogglebox Oscar Wilde quips: ‘He’s having a rummage!’

I am not sure how long the institution of TV itself can survive Gogglebox.

Cara Delevingne’s eyebrows recall feminist artist Frida Kahlo (inset)

Cara Delevingne’s eyebrows recall feminist artist Frida Kahlo (inset)

She of the distinctive eyebrows, model Cara Delevingne, 23 — now bigger than Kate Moss — earned £2.4 million in 2014.

Moreover, she is reported to have signed six movie deals and is praised for playing a waitress in the otherwise ill-regarded Michael Winterbottom film, The Face Of An Angel, about the murder of student Meredith Kercher in Italy.

Ms Delevingne’s eyebrows recall feminist artist Frida Kahlo (1907-1954), wife and muse of celebrated Mexican painter Diego Rivera (1886-1957).

Cara says she’s never been in love, finds it hard to trust people who might steal her money and wishes she could do her schooldays again. Frida, inset, specialised in painting herself, explaining: ‘I am the subject I know best.’ Perhaps Cara will play Frida one day. With burly Spaniard Javier Bardem as Rivera?

Victory for Top Gear’s halfwit fan

The BBC’s director-general, Lord Hall, is being protected by ‘an elite squad’ of eight bodyguards after receiving a ‘credible’ threat that he was going to be killed after firing Top Gear’s Jeremy Clarkson.

No not-mad person would wish to harm Hall for firing Clarkson, even if they’re a fan of the Chipping Norton Set’s principal member.

Nor would any sane person call to warn that they were going to kill Hall for this reason. They’d either try to do it, or not.

One thing’s for sure, all the coverage of the story must have overjoyed the halfwit responsible.

How great is Alan Bennett?

Alan Bennett, 80, is ‘arguably the country’s greatest living playwright’, says a news report about how memory loss means he’ll never perform onstage again. Glad about that ‘arguably’. 

Or maybe they meant to say ‘county’s greatest playwright’ — meaning Bennett’s native Yorkshire. Sir Tom Stoppard won ‘the greatest living playwright’ award at the London Evening Standard Theatre Awards in 2014. 

He (unlike Bennett) made it onto a recent ‘top ten,’ living and dead, of British playwrights. One might also mention Alan Ayckbourn, David Hare and Caryl Churchill. 

Both David Cameron and Ed Miliband were wounded by the fierce ‘interviewing’ style of Jeremy Paxman, who posed a number of insulting, ‘have you now stopped beating your wife?’ questions. 

According to a news report, he is being paid £300,000 for his TV work during the election. So no cause for him to use the food banks he harried Cameron about, or wonder (like Miliband after being quizzed by Jeremy) if he’s up to the job.

Prime Minister David Cameron arrives to be interviewed by Jeremy Paxman of Channel 4 during the filming of 'Cameron & Miliband: The Battle For Number 10'

Prime Minister David Cameron arrives to be interviewed by Jeremy Paxman of Channel 4 during the filming of ‘Cameron & Miliband: The Battle For Number 10′

The Prince of Wales can write what he wishes to ministers, but not expect what he says to remain secret. Who does Charles think he is — George W. Bush, or Tony Blair? 

Their correspondence prior to embarking on the invasion of Iraq must remain confidential, the Chilcot Inquiry was told. After months of wrangling we were informed that ‘redacted’ versions might be seen. Justified by the hoary old ‘interests of national security’. 

Sir Elton John’s mother, Sheila, says her son has not spoken to her for seven years and she has never met her grandchildren. 

Apparently this is because she referred to Sir Elton’s partner David Furnish as ‘that thing’. 

Mothers-in-law say worse about conventional daughters-in-law, surely, but Sir Elton, knowingly or otherwise, has partially shielded himself from public scorn by picking up the living expenses of his estranged mama. 

Not, we must presume, the bill for hiring the Elton lookalike for her 90th birthday party, though. 

Those of us old enough to remember the Vietnam War — and young enough then to think America had a case for helping the South Vietnamese defeat the invading Communists from the North — are chastened to read that united Vietnam wonders if the U.S. will help if it is invaded by increasingly aggressive China. 

‘The temporary enemy has become a partner against the eternal enemy,’ says the New York Times’s UK-born Roger Cohen, who paints such a vivid portrait of shimmering rice paddies, ducks on canals and light green fields that I can’t wait to go there before the Chinese take-over. 

 

Xmas Holidays

Safari tourist survives attack by lion when beast jumped into his car

  • Brendan Smith, from Perth, was in Johannesberg when incident happened
  • He had been in South Africa for only 36 hours before a lion attacked him
  • Perth man said the lion jumped through the window and bit into his legs
  • He said the experience was ‘full-on’ but it could have been a lot worse
  • Mr Smith posted graphic photographs of his injuries to his Facebook page  

By

Louise Cheer for Daily Mail Australia


Published:
20:09 EST, 28 March 2015

|
Updated:
09:35 EST, 29 March 2015

An Australian tourist was lucky to escape with his life after he was mauled by a lion during an African safari tour.

Brendan Smith, from Perth in Western Australia, had landed in Johannesburg in South Africa just 36 hours before the vicious predator jumped through an open car window and attacked him.

In a Facebook post, Mr Smith recalled the terrifying moment he was bitten, with a sense of humour.

GRAPHIC CONTENT WARNING 

Brendan Smith was on an African safari when he mauled by a lion who jumped through a window and bit him

Brendan Smith was on an African safari when he mauled by a lion who jumped through a window and bit him

‘No later than 36 hours after touching down in Africa I find myself in hospital after a lion jumped through the car window and decided to go to town on my legs,’ he wrote.

‘Pretty full-on but am alive, with insurance coming to the party and an influx of curious Africans wanting to see “the lion man”. 

‘Could have and should have been a lot worse but chicks dig scars so I’ll be sweet!’

It is believed the Perth man was on safari near Johannesburg and was treated at the city’s Fourways Life Hospital.  

Mr Smith (pictured with an unidentified friend) posted pictures of his wounds on Facebook with a recount of the horrifying attack

Mr Smith (pictured with an unidentified friend) posted pictures of his wounds on Facebook with a recount of the horrifying attack

Mr Smith’s wounds appear to be deep in graphic photos uploaded on his Facebook page.

His post also included a picture of two female lions lazing on the grass. 

It is not known if these were the lions that attacked him.

One of the pictures show what looks like teeth puncture marks which have broken through Mr Smith’s skin. 

Looking at his page, Mr Smith appears to be an avid adventurer and traveller.

The Perth man said he had escaped with his life and described the experience as 'pretty full-on'

The Perth man said he had escaped with his life and described the experience as ‘pretty full-on’

One of the pictures show what looks like teeth puncture marks which have broken through Mr Smith's skin

One of the pictures show what looks like teeth puncture marks which have broken through Mr Smith’s skin

His photos show him skydiving, eating scorpions, jumping through fire hoops and shooting at a gun range.

His dad, Brian Smith, said he was relieved to hear his son was safe.

‘So glad it’s not worse. Very lucky lad. You will be in pain for weeks,’ Brian wrote on social media.

‘I think u should cut your losses and get on the next plane home after hospital. Take care.’

Friends also expressed their concern for the injured Australian by leaving messages of sympathy under his post.

‘You are one lucky son of a b**** – sort of :-S hope you’re on the mend dude and can enjoy the rest of your trip,’ one friend wrote.

Another well-wisher expressed their shock at the news.

‘Oh my god! You have survived some pretty crazy travel adventures, but this takes the cake,’ she said.

‘Imagine this story at the pub in 40 years time. Sending you loads of love & well wishes xx.’

Mr Smith was planning to continue on to a shark dive in Gansbaai – south of Cape Town – from his safari, but now he is unsure if his plans will still go ahead as he is in hospital.

Xmas Holidays

NHS gives girl aged 12 anti-smoking spray then 20 pupils fall ill from product

  • The incident occurred at Wolstanton High School in Newcastle-under-Lyme
  • Children aged between 11 to 13 suffered vomiting, dizziness and headache
  • The Nicorette mouth spray was brought into the class by a 12-year-old girl 
  • She was prescribed it by the NHS anti-smoking staff who visited the school
  • Experts say anti-addiction product cause ‘acute poisoning’ in non-smokers

By

Sanchez Manning

and
Stephen Adams for The Mail on Sunday


Published:
19:54 EST, 28 March 2015

|
Updated:
09:32 EST, 29 March 2015

Parents have criticised a school where 20 pupils fell ill after using a Nicotine spray prescribed to a 12-year-old – in an incident dismissed as a ‘prank’ by the headmaster.

The children, aged between 11 and 13, suffered vomiting, dizziness and headaches, with one apparently needing hospital treatment.

Incredibly, the Nicorette mouth spray had been brought to class by the 12-year-old after she was prescribed it by NHS anti-smoking staff who visited the school.

Manufacturers say the anti-addiction product is safe for ages 12 and up – but experts claim it can cause acute poisoning in non-smokers.

Parents have criticised Wolstanton High School (pictured) in Newcastle-under-Lyme where 20 pupils fell ill after using a Nicotine spray prescribed to a 12-year-old

Parents have criticised Wolstanton High School (pictured) in Newcastle-under-Lyme where 20 pupils fell ill after using a Nicotine spray prescribed to a 12-year-old

Frantic parents were called to Wolstanton High School in Newcastle-under-Lyme, Staffordshire, last Wednesday after 20 pupils became ill during lunchtime.

One father, whose daughter suffered vomiting and dizziness, expressed his disbelief that a child had been given the spray in the first place. 

He said: ‘It is ridiculous that the school are allowing a girl so young to be prescribed something this dangerous. I agree they should be giving them advice, but she is only 12.

‘It could have been a lot more serious, one of them could have been seriously poisoned.’

A mother, who also asked not to be named, said her 12-year-old son tried the spray, adding: ‘When he was collected he was extremely pale, holding on to the rail outside and some of the others had been sick. He’s suffered a toxic overdose.’

It is understood one pupil even attended the Royal Stoke University Hospital’s A&E for a heart check-up. But despite parents’ concerns, the school’s headmaster Alan Aston appeared to downplay the ‘regrettable’ incident as a practical joke.

He said: ‘The spray was shared with other pupils and they became nauseous. We have dealt with the pupil involved using our own sanctions … unfortunately this was a prank that went wrong.’

Manufacturers say the anti-addiction product (pictured) is safe for ages 12 and up – but experts claim it can cause acute poisoning in non-smokers

Manufacturers say the anti-addiction product (pictured) is safe for ages 12 and up – but experts claim it can cause acute poisoning in non-smokers

The girl was prescribed the nicotine spray by Staffordshire and Stoke-on-Trent Partnership NHS Trust, which ran an anti-smoking course called ‘Time to Quit’ at the comprehensive school.

When he was collected he was extremely pale, holding on to the rail outside and some of the others had been sick. He’s suffered a toxic overdose 
Mother whose 12-year-old son tried the spray

Ian Saberton, the scheme’s service manager, said his staff had followed the proper procedures.

He added: ‘All pupils who request support receive an appointment, after which they are required to do some preparation for a quit attempt. Medication is only recommended at the following appointment.’

Mr Aston defended the course, saying that as most of the school’s pupils are underage, ‘smoking is illegal, which we take very seriously’.

Johnson & Johnson, which makes the spray, says it is safe for adults and children over 12.

But the electronic Medicines Compendium (eMC), whose information is vetted by regulators, warns: ‘Products containing nicotine should not be left where they may be misused, handled or ingested by children.’

Although the spray’s 1mg dose is small – a lethal dose for an adult who doesn’t smoke is 40 to 60mg – the eMC says those who are not used to nicotine can suffer poisoning symptoms such as vomiting and dizziness.

 

Xmas Holidays

We viewers deserved better than this Jeremy Paxman pummelling

By

Amanda Platell for the Daily Mail


Published:
20:59 EST, 27 March 2015

|
Updated:
08:18 EST, 28 March 2015

Remember how, at the start of this Parliament, both David Cameron and Ed Miliband pledged an end to the yah-boo politics? 

They knew that nothing turned off voters (especially women) more than the abusive, testosterone-fuelled shouting matches that had become the norm in the Commons.

It was a promise that lasted about five minutes.

The so-called leaders’ TV election debates on Thursday was a nasty, aggression-fuelled and adversarial piece of ugly political theatre, writes Amanda Platell

The so-called leaders’ TV election debates on Thursday was a nasty, aggression-fuelled and adversarial piece of ugly political theatre, writes Amanda Platell

Fast forward five years and the first of the so-called leaders’ TV election debates on Thursday was a nasty, aggression-fuelled and adversarial piece of ugly political theatre.

This time, however, it was not the fault of Cameron or Miliband, but of their interviewer turned interrogator, Jeremy Paxman, who was at his sneering, arrogant, insulting worst.

What was the point of it all, except to show that TV’s old Tyrannosaurus had lost neither his teeth nor his appetite for tearing jugulars?

Both Cameron and Miliband were left bloodied — and you can’t help but wonder how the Prime Minister, in particular, seemed so ill-prepared for such a mauling.

At least Miliband put up half a fight, despite Paxman’s particularly unpleasant jibe that even his own MPs thought he was a ‘North London geek’.

The real victims, of course, were us; the three million viewers who, I would suggest, learnt hardly anything about the two men and their respective plans for leading our country.

True, we were informed that Mr Cameron couldn’t survive on a zero-hours contract wage, and that Ed still felt bruised about stabbing his brother in the back.

Well, there’s a surprise for you.

Both Cameron (centre) and Miliband were left bloodied — and you can’t help but wonder how the Prime Minister, in particular, seemed so ill-prepared for such a mauling, writes Amanda Platell

Both Cameron (centre) and Miliband were left bloodied — and you can’t help but wonder how the Prime Minister, in particular, seemed so ill-prepared for such a mauling, writes Amanda Platell

The big issues — like how and where the two men would cut the deficit, control immigration, improve the NHS or renegotiate a fair deal for Britain in Europe — were all but ignored or side-stepped.

Any number of interviewers could have done a better, more civilised, more informative job: Andrew Neil, Dermot Murnaghan or Andrew Marr among them.

Instead, we got two rounds of Paxo pummelling. With 39 days to go to the General Election, and with so much at stake, we voters deserved better than this. 

WHO’S WALKING WHO, ED?

Looking at this PR stunt by Ed Miliband, who invited the TV cameras to film him taking his sons to school, I couldn’t help but wonder who was taking care of whom. 

After all, this is the dad who can’t even be trusted with a bacon sandwich.

Still, sweet to hear Ed say it was a rare treat. Yes, I guess it’s usually the live-in nanny’s job to take the kids to school — after she’s made her breakfast in the staff kitchenette.

Consciously undressed

We all know she’s been through a tough time recently, but what possessed Gwyneth Paltrow to walk out in a granny cardigan and shorts so skimpy that they were invisible to the naked eye?

Or had she just become consciously uncoupled from her trousers?

What possessed Gwyneth Paltrow to walk out in a granny cardigan and shorts so skimpy that they were invisible to the naked eye?

What possessed Gwyneth Paltrow to walk out in a granny cardigan and shorts so skimpy that they were invisible to the naked eye?

Having won its Supreme Court battle to have Prince Charles’ ‘black spider’ letters to ministers released, the Guardian newspaper is triumphant.

I suspect its campaign was less about the public’s right to know and more about a bunch of rabid republicans wanting to do everything they can to discredit our future King.

Since many of Charles’ heartfelt views are shared by millions across the land, I reckon his popularity will only increase when the letters are published — and the plot to undermine him backfires spectacularly.

He may be worth £235 million. Yet pictures of David Beckham sporting a scruffy old beard and tattoos covering much of his body are a far cry from his gorgeous ‘goldenballs’ days.

If you saw him in the street, you’d be tempted to throw the poor tramp a few coins. 

Pictures of David Beckham sporting a scruffy old beard and tattoos covering much of his body are a far cry from his gorgeous ‘goldenballs’ days

Pictures of David Beckham sporting a scruffy old beard and tattoos covering much of his body are a far cry from his gorgeous ‘goldenballs’ days

You can’t help but admire film-maker Sam Taylor-Johnson for politely declining the lucrative offer to direct the sequel to Fifty Shades Of Grey, despite it making £340 million at the box office worldwide. 

Even a pair of golden handcuffs couldn’t bind her to that mindless, misogynistic nonsense again. 

Having been named the world’s fourth-greatest thinker by a small Left-wing magazine, Russell Brand plans to open a cafe and launch a chain of not-for-profit enterprises which will ‘eventually trade with each other in our own currency’.

So they’ll be trading in inanities, then.

A costly fling

Former Oasis singer Liam Gallagher has finally settled a paternity suit with an American journalist who is mother to his two-year-old love child. 

A child, incidentally, whom he has never seen. He will now have to pay Liza Ghorbani £36,000 a year — a costly outcome for a quick fling. How much cheaper if he’d bought a packet of condoms.

Zayn Malik (pictured) said he quite One Direction to be a normal 22-year-old

Zayn Malik (pictured) said he quite One Direction to be a normal 22-year-old

When Zayn Malik quit the boy band One Direction, he said it was because he never wanted to be famous and longed for the normal life of a 22-year-old.

Now fans learn he’s been in the recording studio for months and is soon to launch his solo career.

Yet another celebrity pleading for privacy while his PR machine spins as busily as ever.

A Lithuanian burglar who ransacked 200 homes has been let off a five-year prison sentence so he can attend ‘victim empathy lessons’. He will also be subject to a 9pm-to-6am curfew.

How reassuring for homeowners. From now on, he can only loot their treasures while they’re at work.

Tom Jones admitted this year’s contestants on The Voice were rubbish. We also hear the debut album of 2014 winner, Jermain Jackman, has sold fewer than 1,000 copies. A case of 15 seconds of fame. 

Eyebrows were raised when the occasional presenter of Newsnight, Emily Maitlis, appeared on screen looking curiously androgynous, wearing mannish black trousers, white shirt, waistcoat and a spotted red tie. But then, given that she lost out on the top presenting job to the bejewelled Evan Davis, who can blame her? 

WESTMINSTER NOTICEBOARD 

  • A Cameron plot to sneak through a new law to oust Speaker Bercow came to a humiliating end when even his own MPs voted against it. As Leader of the House, William Hague was forced to see through this grubby deal, his last act in the Commons and an ignominious end to a brilliant career. I wish he’d been treated more kindly.
  • Farewell, too, to Gordon Brown, who made a barnstorming speech on his final day as an MP. At least we know he will continue to fight for the things he has always believed in, not just line his pockets like Tony Blair.
  • Treasury minister Priti Patel says attacks on her by the Labour candidate in her Essex seat are misogynistic and racist. John Clarke tweeted that she was both a ‘sexy Bond villain’ and the ‘village idiot’. Priti has never hidden her allure and her ethnicity has been no barrier to rapid promotion. Playing the race card is beneath her flutttering eyelashes.
  • Theresa May’s crackdown on Muslim extremists includes a ban on asylum for terror suspects. But then how asonishing that terrorists were ever allowed to seek citizenship here in the first place.

 

Xmas Holidays

Single New Yorkers reveal the most outrageous – and downright bizarre – texts they have received from their exes

By

Erica Tempesta For Dailymail.com


Published:
10:43 EST, 26 March 2015

|
Updated:
12:08 EST, 26 March 2015

New York City singles have been filmed reading the strange last texts they’ve received from their exes in a hilarious video that proves dating in the Big Apple has become all the more complicated thanks to modern technology.

Comedy duo Eva McEnrue and Mel Owens gathered a group of New Yorkers and had them recite the ‘Famous Last Texts’ they’ve received from their former significant others, hooks ups, and even ‘friends with benefits’, to create a humorous – yet realistic – look at dating in the age of social media.

‘And you thought “Mean Tweets” was depressing…’ reads the YouTube video’s description. ‘We’ve heard that all good things come to an end. We just didn’t expect it to end with a text message… received at 2am.’ 

For real? Comedy writer Mel Owens can be seen reading the last text message she  received from a guy named Jake Harrison, who apparently canceled their date because he was already seeing someone else

For real? Comedy writer Mel Owens can be seen reading the last text message she received from a guy named Jake Harrison, who apparently canceled their date because he was already seeing someone else

The clip begins with one woman looking at her phone as she reads a message from a guy, whose phone number she saved under ‘Ignore’.  

‘I am not going to pretend it’s working,’ he had texted her. 

Another woman received a more elaborate break-up text from ‘Ryan from Tinder’.   

‘Hey, I am really sorry if I got a bit caught up in what was really an excellent date,’ she read from his text. ‘You’re an awesome girl, but I am not sure I see a future for us dating-wise.’

And he didn’t stop there. 

Ryan added: ‘And you can totes toss that belt I left at your place. It was broke anyway [sic].’

One of the guys from the video received what could perhaps be viewed as a totally legitimate gripe from ‘Heather from Hinge’.

FYI: Sean Elliot wanted the woman he used to date to know how much money he was making 

FYI: Sean Elliot wanted the woman he used to date to know how much money he was making 

Strange goodbye: Kelsey was keen to get some information from this man about returning a gift. He never heard from her again

Strange goodbye: Kelsey was keen to get some information from this man about returning a gift. He never heard from her again

Big mistake: Chris from Coachella apologized to comedy writer Eva McEnrue because he was drunk when they hung out

Big mistake: Chris from Coachella apologized to comedy writer Eva McEnrue because he was drunk when they hung out

‘I’m not in town this weekend and FYI you might want to ask me out for dinner instead of texting me to hang out late night,’ he said as he read her message aloud. 

Since it was the last text that she had ever sent him, it’s safe to assume that he never ended up taking her out.

One of the ladies featured in the clip revealed that ‘Nick (Shark Week)’ had bluntly texted her: ‘Wanna make out?’

Other messages were even more outrageous.  

‘I just wanted you to know that I am making $100,000 a year now,’ Sean Elliot boasted to the woman he had been seeing.

Someone noted that after he had slept with a woman named Kate three times, she sent him this message: ‘I had fun too, but I’d rather you didn’t tell anyone about it. I am not even sure we can do it again. 

‘After all, I am still technically married.’ 

Another New York woman had a similar message from a man named Jake Harrison. 

Weird excuse: Jared texted this New Yorker to say that he was too busy to respond to her message because he was 'in the zone'

Weird excuse: Jared texted this New Yorker to say that he was too busy to respond to her message because he was ‘in the zone’

Being honest: This guy admitted that he was actually  the one who sent this strange text message

Being honest: This guy admitted that he was actually the one who sent this strange text message

‘Sorry I never rescheduled our date. I actually have a girlfriend,’ she read aloud.   

Other people chose to leave the person they were seeing hanging on for eternity.

‘Wall Street Bro’ texted one woman: ‘On my way.’ She never heard from him again. 

‘Basketball Steve’ told one woman: ‘I’ll keep you posted’.

‘I am still waiting to be posted,’ she dryly told the camera. 

But the most bizarre message had to be the last text one woman received from Chester, whom she met on OK Cupid.

‘Sorry I was at my friend’s wake yesterday and on my way to the burial now. Can’t really talk,’ she read aloud. 

The video, which was shared earlier this month, has already received more than one million views, proving that when it comes to dating and rejection everyone loves company.  

Xmas Holidays

Design Team Call …………

DT CALL

THIS
POST WILL REMAIN AT THE TOP UNTIL 15th April 2015.  PLEASE
SCROLL DOWN FOR CURRENT CHALLENGE.

Would
you like to be more prepared at christmas?

Do you
love making Christmas cards/projects?

Would
you like to join an easy going, fun loving, friendly Design Team?

If the
answer is yes to the above questions then you could be just the person we are
looking for.

We are
looking for two new DT members and we are therefore inviting applications.

You do
not need to have previous experience of DT membership, just be enthusiastic and
a regular blogger. We have two teams so you will need to be able to make a
card/project once a fortnight. We take it in turns to host the challenges and
choose the winners. You will also be expected to comment on one number in every
ten. 

If this
sounds like the challenge for you then please link to your blog below. 

Please
link to your blog address not a specific post so we can stop by to visit you.

Applications
will be open until 5.00 pm on 10th April 2015.

Thanks for
looking and good luck to all those who enter.





Christmas 2013

first man arrested for the horrific gang-rape of an elderly Indian nun in her convent

  • Mohammad Salim Shaikh was detained in Mumbai yesterday evening
  • 74-year-old nun raped after stopping gang from assaulting another woman
  • CCTV was released of six men but it is not known if Salim was one of them
  • Attack caused days of furious demonstrations and peaceful protests 

By

Lydia Willgress for MailOnline


Published:
05:58 EST, 26 March 2015

|
Updated:
12:33 EST, 26 March 2015

Police have arrested their first suspect over the gang-rape of an elderly nun at an Indian convent.

Mohammad Salim Shaikh, 30, was detained in a hideout in Mumbai on Wednesday night and has been transferred to Kolkata, a police spokesman said.

His arrest comes 12 days after the 74-year-old nun was locked in a room and raped while trying to prevent six men from assaulting another woman and robbing the Christian missionary school.

Scroll down for video 

Arrest: Police have arrested Mohammad Salim Shaikh over the gang-rape of an elderly nun at a Indian convent

Arrest: Police have arrested Mohammad Salim Shaikh over the gang-rape of an elderly nun at a Indian convent

Mumbai police commissioner Rakesh Maria said: ‘The West Bengal team had the lead, they shared the information with us and sought our assistance. 

‘The assistance was provided and the accused was arrested from the Nagpada area and has been taken away by the Bengal team,’ he told The Indian Express.

CCTV was released three days after the attack showing some of the suspects leaving the staff room at the Convent of Jesus and Mary School in West Bengal. A reward of 100,000 rupees (£1,075) was on offer for any leads, police said.

They detained five men for questioning but did not make any arrests. It is not known if Salim was caught on camera, Indian TV reported.

Guarded: The 30-year-old was made to sit inside a police vehicle, which was waiting outside a court in Ranaghat

Guarded: The 30-year-old was made to sit inside a police vehicle, which was waiting outside a court in Ranaghat

Careful: The guards clutched Salim's arms and made sure he had handcuffs on as they led him past the press

Careful: The guards clutched Salim’s arms and made sure he had handcuffs on as they led him past the press

Arnab Ghosh, a police superintendent, said the men, aged between 20 and 30, scaled the boundary wall around 11.40pm on Friday 13 March. 

They entered the school and disconnected the telephone lines, he added. 

The robbers then tied up and gagged a security guard before entering the nuns’ room, where they found the women sleeping.

When the victim, who is the oldest nun at the school, tried to stop them taking another woman into a separate room they raped her. 

Caught: Three men were pictured on the Convent of Jesus and Mary School's CCTV but it is not known if Salim was one of them

Caught: Three men were pictured on the Convent of Jesus and Mary School’s CCTV but it is not known if Salim was one of them

Suspects: The CCTV footage was released three days after the attack showing the suspects leaving the school's staff room around midnight. Five other men were detained for questioning

Suspects: The CCTV footage was released three days after the attack showing the suspects leaving the school’s staff room around midnight. Five other men were detained for questioning

The men escaped with some cash, a mobile phone, a laptop and a camera. 

They also ransacked the school’s chapel and took holy items. CCTV showed books and papers strewn across the floor as the men left the staff room.

Mr Ghosh added: ‘At least two of them were armed and the rest were carrying burglary tools. In the chapel, a holy scripture was found torn and a bust of Jesus was broken.’

The nun was taken to hospital in Ranaghat around 7am on Saturday 14. 

Demonstrations: Prayers were said at churches across India. Hundreds of people staged a demonstration in Ranaghat, where the nun is being treated in hospital, two days after the attack to demand justice

Demonstrations: Prayers were said at churches across India. Hundreds of people staged a demonstration in Ranaghat, where the nun is being treated in hospital, two days after the attack to demand justice

Sorrow: Nuns gathered in front of the convent after the attack. Archbishop Thomas D'Souza said the sisters prayed for the victim during Sunday Mass

Sorrow: Nuns gathered in front of the convent after the attack. Archbishop Thomas D’Souza said the sisters prayed for the victim during Sunday Mass

Outrage: The robbers tied up and gagged a security guard before entering the nuns’ room. Furious residents and students took to the streets after the attack to demand justice

Atindranath Mondal, hospital superintendent, told The Times of India: ‘Immediately a team of doctors attended to her and a senior gynaecologist operated on her.’

She is now thought to be recovering well.  

After the attack furious residents took to the streets, demanding action and blocking off the main highway.

Hundreds of students from the school carried banners with the slogan ‘we want justice’.

Prayers: Crowds of students from the Christian missionary school lit dozens of candles at a peaceful protest

Scene of the crime: Police stood guard outside the convent school at Ranaghat,  north of Calcutta, while others searched for evidence

Scene of the crime: Police stood guard outside the convent school at Ranaghat, north of Calcutta, while others searched for evidence

Mamata Banerjee, West Bengal Chief Minister, tweeted her condemnation of what she called a ‘horrific attack’ promising ‘swift, strong action’.

Archbishop Thomas D’Souza said: ‘They not only committed a heinous crime, but they also vandalized the chapel. 

‘This is the first time such an attack has happened in India.’

Xmas Holidays

The changing face of New York: Previously unseen images by legendary photographer Weegee offer fascinating snapshot of city’s transformation over course of 70 years 

  • Pictures by crime photographer Arthur Fellig, better known as Weegee, show life in New York in the 1940s and 50s
  • Images of the same locations were taken this month and show how the city has changed dramatically since 
  • Wartime photographs drawn from archives of the International Center of Photography and appear in a new book

By

Julian Robinson for MailOnline


Published:
06:48 EST, 26 March 2015

|
Updated:
12:11 EST, 26 March 2015

These stunning images show the bustling heart of New York in the middle of the 20th century – and how times have changed in the city.

Pictures taken in the 1940s and 1950s by legendary crime photographer Arthur Fellig, better known as Weegee, are shown alongside shots of the same areas captured this month.

They include an image of a man lying drunk next to the former police department headquarters on Center Street in 1945 – and the same spot 70 years later.  

A man is pictured lying drunk on the ground on Center Street in a 1945 picture called 'Derelict sleeping on the sidewalk outside police headquarters' (left). A woman walks past the same engraved sign for the former Police Department on March 18 this year (right)

A man is pictured lying drunk on the ground on Center Street in a 1945 picture called ‘Derelict sleeping on the sidewalk outside police headquarters’ (left). A woman walks past the same engraved sign for the former Police Department on March 18 this year (right)

A lightning bolt strikes above Lower Manhattan on July 27, 1940 (top) in a picture taken by legendary crime photographer Arthur Fellig. A picture taken from the same vantage point (bottom) shows how the skyline has changed over the last 75 years

A lightning bolt strikes above Lower Manhattan on July 27, 1940 (top) in a picture taken by legendary crime photographer Arthur Fellig. A picture taken from the same vantage point (bottom) shows how the skyline has changed over the last 75 years

Bright lights: Weegee's photograph 'Neon billboards on Times Square' (top), taken in September 1957, and an image taken from the same spot earlier this month (bottom) shows how the area has changed over the years

Bright lights: Weegee’s photograph ‘Neon billboards on Times Square’ (top), taken in September 1957, and an image taken from the same spot earlier this month (bottom) shows how the area has changed over the years

A 1940 photo of Lower Manhattan, shot at night from across the river near the Brooklyn Bridge, is dominated by a mere three skyscrapers, a shocking contrast to the forest of towers now surrounding 1 World Trade.

A 1946 image shows a fire in a loft building at Fulton and Greenwich streets. The intersection would be unrecognizable to Weegee today: It’s the site of the 9/11 Memorial and museum.

A 1952 picture shows the stately, pristine stone facade of One Times Square, where a spire on the roof is still used for the New Year’s Eve ball drop.

Today the building’s exterior is covered with billboards.

But Weegee’s 1957 view of Times Square does show neon ads, including now-outmoded brands like Admiral TV appliances alongside still-familiar names like Budweiser. 

Then and now: Shops and businesses have sprung up along Doyers Street in the heart of New York’s Chinatown (bottom). Weegee photographed a fire on the same street (top) on January 17, 1941

Weegee photographed The Empire State Building in 1943 (left) from behind a 'loans sign'. A picture taken this month (right) shows how the view from the same spot has changed in the last 70 years

Weegee photographed The Empire State Building in 1943 (left) from behind a ‘loans sign’. A picture taken this month (right) shows how the view from the same spot has changed in the last 70 years

WEEGEE: THE NOTORIOUS PHOTOJOURNALIST FAMED FOR ARRIVING AT CRIME SCENES BEFORE POLICE

Arthur Fellig (pictured) went by the pseudonym Weegee, derived from a Ouija board - chosen for his ability to arrive at crime scenes before police 

Arthur Fellig (pictured) went by the pseudonym Weegee, derived from a Ouija board – chosen for his ability to arrive at crime scenes before police 

He was the photojournalist who prowled the streets of New York, capturing crime scenes and revelling in his own notoriety.

Arthur Fellig went by the pseudonym Weegee, derived from a Ouija board – chosen for his ability to arrive at crime scenes before police. He is credited with setting a new standard for tabloid photojournalism with his distinct and dramatic black and white street photography.

He started out as a Hollywood paparazzo but his talents eventually landed him freelance jobs for a variety of New York newspapers and photo agencies.

In a 2006 article entitled ‘Unknown Weegee, on Photographer Who Made The Night Noir’, New York Times reporter Holland Cotter described his technique.

‘He prowled the streets in a car equipped with a police radio, a typewriter, developing equipment, a supply of cigars and a change of underwear,’ Mr Cotter wrote, dubbing Weegee a ‘one-man photo factory’.

‘He drove to a crime site; took pictures; developed the film, using the trunk as a darkroom; and delivered the prints.’ 

Weegee was born Usher Fellig in Zlockzów, Austrian Galicia (now Ukraine), but his name was changed to Arthur when his family emigrated to New York in 1909.

He became known for his obsession with the macabre with his stills of New York’s crime-ridden Lower East Side, but eventually returned to his roots in Hollywood.

His 1945 book of photographs, Naked City, was the inspiration behind the 1947 film of the same name and he was uncredited as a still photographer in the 1964 Stanley Kubrick film Dr Strangelove.

He revelled in his own notoriety, stamping the back of his pictures with ‘Credit Photo by Weegee the Famous’.

Speaking of his archive, he once said: ‘The easiest kind of a job to cover was a murder. The stiff would be laying on the ground.

‘He couldn’t get up and walk away or get temperamental.’

He died in December 1968 at the age of 69. In 1980, his widow Wilma Wilcox formed The Weegee Portfolio Incorporated to create a collection of his works from the original negatives and his entire archive was donated to the International Center of Photography in New York in 1993.

Flashback: Crowds of men gather next to what is now the Barclay's Center, in a picture taken on March 18, 1943 called 'Wartime rationing: retail butchers await arrival of meat' (top). The same area, next to the Atlantic Mall, is shown below as it appears today

Flashback: Crowds of men gather next to what is now the Barclay’s Center, in a picture taken on March 18, 1943 called ‘Wartime rationing: retail butchers await arrival of meat’ (top). The same area, next to the Atlantic Mall, is shown below as it appears today

Other photos, lined up with contemporary views of the same spot, are surprisingly unchanged – like a 1939 scene in Little Italy where small shops still line the sidewalks. A 1953 photo shows Humphrey Bogart on the marquee of the Victory movie theater, home now to the New Victory, which specializes in children’s entertainment. 

The Weegee photographs appear in a new guidebook, The Weegee Guide to New York, which includes never-before published work mostly drawn from the archives of the International Center of Photography.

Most of the book’s photos show ordinary neighborhoods and streetscapes with low-rise buildings, bulky cars, empty skies and remarkably uncluttered public spaces. 

Publishers Prestel say the book takes readers on ‘excursions through Weegee’s stamping grounds, from the Bowery to Midtown, the West Side to the East, and with a little Brooklyn thrown in’. 

It adds that the photographs ‘reinforce Weegee’s lasting vision of New York as a city both tough and resilient, a city that never sleeps.’

Fellig moved to America from Eastern Europe as a child in 1909 and lived in the Lower East Side. As an adult, he went on to become a press photographer, famed for his pictures of urban life, crime and death.

His nickname is said to have derived from a Ouija board – chosen for his ability to arrive at crime scenes before police. 

Fire crews battle a blaze at the intersection of Fulton and Greenwich Streets in a 1946 picture called 'Fire in a loft building' (left). A photograph taken earlier this month (right) shows people lining up for the September 11 Museum near the World Trade Center transportation hub

Fire crews battle a blaze at the intersection of Fulton and Greenwich Streets in a 1946 picture called ‘Fire in a loft building’ (left). A photograph taken earlier this month (right) shows people lining up for the September 11 Museum near the World Trade Center transportation hub

Another picture provided by the International Center of Photography shows the Times Building in 1952 (left) - free from the neon billboards that can be seen at the same spot today (right)

Another picture provided by the International Center of Photography shows the Times Building in 1952 (left) – free from the neon billboards that can be seen at the same spot today (right)

Food for thought: The 24-hour Ham n Egg restaurant on West 51st Street (top) is shown in Weegee's 1953 photo. People walk past a Starbucks Coffee at the same spot earlier this month

Food for thought: The 24-hour Ham n Egg restaurant on West 51st Street (top) is shown in Weegee’s 1953 photo. People walk past a Starbucks Coffee at the same spot earlier this month

Crowds are pictured along Wall Street in May 1945 as the nation was celebrating VE Day (left). A picture taken from the same vantage point shows the area as it appears today (right)

Crowds are pictured along Wall Street in May 1945 as the nation was celebrating VE Day (left). A picture taken from the same vantage point shows the area as it appears today (right)

The photos in the book are organized by neighborhood, with maps and locations for each, including which direction Weegee was facing when he took the picture. The information makes it easy to compare images with how the city looks today – either by walking around or by going on Google Street View.

‘The classic New York skyline has changed dramatically since Weegee’s day, and the flurry of often mundane building construction over the last decades has obscured many of New York’s iconic skyscrapers,’ said Philomena Mariani, director of publications at the International Center of Photography, who compiled the book with another ICP staff member, Christopher George.

ICP owns 20,000 Weegee images, but for this book, Mariani said, ‘We were looking for pictures that showed something of New York’s built environment and public life,’ including images of crowds gathered for celebrations and shoppers waiting for rationed goods.

Mariani said she hopes the book will get people thinking not only about ‘how different the urban landscape is physically,’ but also about ‘the public life that existed through the mid-20th century that Weegee captured.’

A 1945 picture called 'Victory' shows men and women at a Chinese restaurant (top). A woman walks down the same staircase earlier this month. A new guidebook of Weegee's photos includes pictures drawn from the archives of the International Center of Photography

A 1945 picture called ‘Victory’ shows men and women at a Chinese restaurant (top). A woman walks down the same staircase earlier this month. A new guidebook of Weegee’s photos includes pictures drawn from the archives of the International Center of Photography

Victory: An August 1945 picture called 'Celebration in the Garment District on Japanese offer to surrender' is shown left while the same street is pictured right

Victory: An August 1945 picture called ‘Celebration in the Garment District on Japanese offer to surrender’ is shown left while the same street is pictured right

A 1953 Weegee photo called 'Showing Tonite' (top) captured 42nd Street in New York. Theater signs can still be seen lining the same street today (bottom)

A 1953 Weegee photo called ‘Showing Tonite’ (top) captured 42nd Street in New York. Theater signs can still be seen lining the same street today (bottom)

Xmas Holidays

Embossing!! (either wet or dry)

Godmorning to you all!!,
 ..and warm Welcome to a new challenge at Winter Wonderland!!
 -Lena here. 
This is my first post on this blog, I´m a little bit nervous but it will probably be fine!! ;-)
Lovely creations in last weeks challenge, thank you all for beautiful inspiring entries!!


                                     Random org has chosen a winner and it´s..



Congratulations!! 
Please email Lynsey to claim your prize from…
..before the end of the current challenge. 

This is the top 3 for this week..
Lovely work ladies..



You´re welcome to pic our top 3 banner to display proudly on your blog.
In the upcoming challenge we want to see…

Embossing

…on your creations, either wet or dry! 
We look forward to see your projects.. :-)
Please remember Christmas projects only.
The sponsor this week is; 
..and the price is a voucher worth £10!




Here’s the lovely inspirationcards from the DT.  
We always appreciate a visit from you so if you click the name you can hop over and leave them a comment and also find out if they have combined their challenge with any others, which could give you some ideas.

We all hope you are able to join us in our challenge this week. We look forward to visiting your blogs and seeing your gorgeous creations. Please be sure to post a link back to the Winter Wonderland blog in your blog post in order to be eligible for this weeks prize! Thursday evening (5pm GMT) is the deadline for your creation to qualify for the prizes.
So get creative and leave your lovely entry here with the blue frog so we can come and wisit you asap.
Have fun and remember you can enter each challenge up to 3 times.
Lena and the Snowflakes Teamies xxx 


Christmas 2013